WILDTHG TRAVEL

Day Trip to Mount Rigi from Zürich – The Perfect Natural Escape

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Oct 17, 2018

Feeling cooped up with city life, or simply craving some crisp mountain air? Mount Rigi is the perfect getaway that you can do in one day (or even just a morning/afternoon), and without any special planning or gear. Trains from Zürich HB leave every hour straight to Arth Goldau station, from where the Rigi train departs. Ride the tiny blue train for about 40 minutes uphill at a snail pace, taking in some truly gorgeous views on the way up.

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Idyllic houses overlooking picturesque valleys

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Swiss life is the good life

I decided on a whim to visit Mount Rigi one afternoon and took the 2:09PM train from Züruch HB, so I arrived at the end station (Rigi Kulm) just before 4PM. This gave me a few hours to walk around the small peak grassy area and take in the stunning panoramic views of the hills and lakes below, and alpine peaks in the background, before sunset around 6:30PM (in October).

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You can even choose your desired difficulty – “the steep” path or “the comfy path” of the route to the top (it’s really quite a short walk) 

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There always seems to be someone parasailing in Switzerland!!

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The views that greet you as soon as you reach the top of Rigi Kulm are breathtaking – this is just one angle!

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The perfect place to ponder the meaning of life

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note that Swiss sheep also wear bells – definitely adds to the ambiance up here

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View over magical valleys

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I could sit up here all day

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Can you imagine living here?!

At the top of Rigi Kulm there is a full restaurant that is part of a hotel and it seems to serve proper hot meals all day (it was closed by the time we went but again, it was close to 6PM) – but you can still buy sandwiches, chips, drinks and snacks. We sat on the outdoor patio built like a jetty to jut out over the hill with a beautiful view of the mountains and facing the setting sun.

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After having a snack, we made our way down past the wooden lounge chairs to the edge of the fence to witness the stunning golden glow of a magical sunset.

 

I took this opportunity to test out a few different DSLR settings, but because I struggle with technology, I think some of my iPhone pics might have turned out better – I’ll let you be the judge of that.

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Talk about location goals

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No photo could ever possibly capture the beauty of these colors

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The last rays of the setting sun were hot magenta pink – and magical clouds formed to the right and were illuminated bright pink then deep purple after the sun went down

The views from up here – and the sunset – are things I could never ever get sick of and it makes me think twice about city life. This is a perfect place to getaway from the hustle and bustle for a bit, even just for a few hours. Take your mind off things, breathe some fresh mountain air and let your soul drink in the beauty of this amazing planet. If you want to make it a longer trip, even for several days, there are several hotels in the area and plenty of daytime activities to keep you and your family busy!

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Golden hour at Mount Rigi

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A sky on fire 

There are several trains down for those of you that wish to catch the sunset (highly recommended if you’re already there during the afternoon!!!) I took the 7:00PM train, which sadly no longer connects directly to Arth Goldau, so the way back to Zürich HB involves two middle of nowhere bus connections and then a train, but as with all trips in Switzerland – my recommendation is to simply trust the SBB app to plan your trip, and make sure you have decent phone battery on the way down!

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Last glimpse of the molten-lava sun as it dipped beneath the skyline

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Gelmersee: the Lake Louise of Switzerland

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Oct 9, 2018

Any chance you’ve recently drooled over pictures of Canada’s Banff National Park? For very good reason; the stunning turquoise of the glacial lakes, like Lake Louise, is enough to make me want to go right now. Well, I can interestingly say that I’ve found the lake’s European TWIN, in Switzerland! Let me convince you of the likeness with a couple (ok, a TON) of photos.

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Mid-morning at Gelmersee in October 

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IMG_1531.JPGGelmersee is a hydroelectric reservoir held by a dam that was constructed in 1932. The “lake” can be reached by taking the Gelmerbahn, a ride of duration 8-10 minutes with a maximum inclination of 106%! According to a map posted at the lake’s entrance, it can also be reached by foot via a hiking trail (in red, below). One can also continue hiking further upwards to reach the Gelmerhütte, a lookout point above the lake.

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Crisp autumn morning with touches of early snow

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The lake radiates a vibrant turquoise when the sunlight hits the water

Gelmersee is an excellent place for a quiet hike and to enjoy the spectacular natural beauty of the glacial water. There is a hiking trail around the entire lake, which takes about two full hours to complete with some stops. If you plan to take 3489283 photos like I did or want extra time to sit and enjoy the views every once and a while, maybe have a picnic halfway on one of the large flat rocks that are perfect for sitting and relaxing, it would be best to allow several hours up at the lake. It is important to plan your visit ahead because there is limited space on the Gelmerbahn and tickets sell out, especially in summer and during nice weather. Read more here about how to plan your trip and riding the Gelmerbahn. 

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Starting the hike around Gelmersee – The trail is quite rocky in places and narrow in others (at one point, there is a rope to hang on to for extra balance and security), so it is recommended to bring sturdy walking/hiking shoes with good soles and be relatively sure-footed if you plan to do the whole hike. It is relatively flat, so not very strenuous.

For me, this little piece of the world is a slice of heaven on earth, and I could honestly happily stay here for hours and hours and hours, hiking around the lake again and again, staring into the turquoise water and pondering my existence… alas, I had only booked 2.5 hours at the top before our return trip on the Gelmerbahn, so we had to really make every minute count – which we did!!

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Is this place even real?! 

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Attempting – and failing – to do a nice little yoga pose (it seemed fitting)

Needless to say, Gelmersee has earned a permanent spot on my life’s repeat bucket list, if that’s even a thing (you know, those absolute favorite places you simply must visit, perhaps at least once a year or every few months even?!) The dream is to visit this place in summer – even though I doubt anyone dares to swim in the ice cold glacial waters, I could totally get involved with sunbathing and reading on a rock all day, minus a few layers.

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Tips for visiting Gelmersee: 

  • Plan your visit ahead, book tickets on the Gelmerbahn
  • Allow as much time as you need, depending on how much hiking, photos and picnicking you want to do
  • Bring camera, sturdy walking/hiking shoes, layers/rain gear just in case

Escape to a Secret Paradise – Koh Lipe, Thailand

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Jun 10, 2017

I was looking for a weekend getaway from KL’s clouds that would include sand, sunshine and beach; I had to look no further than Thailand, of course, and a friend had recently told me about a certain Koh Lipe, which was supposed to be amazing, tranquil and gorgeous – it did not disappoint. Here is my weekend tale to an absolutely dreamy and delicious tropical paradise, an easy ferry ride away from Langkawi, Malaysia!

 

My weekend started with a short hop with Air Asia from KL to Langkawi island; let me just tell you, they went ALL out for the domestic terminal at KLIA2 (not). If and when you fly domestically in Malaysia… indeed just take all escalators down until it feels as though you’re underground and just keep walking through that hallway… you will actually find your gate eventually, assumptions aside. After properly stocking up on chocolate, I was ready for my flight with all but my earphones, so unfortunately forgotten at home. Luckily enough, I ended up next to AND in front of an entire troupe of kicking, crying and screaming children, which as everyone knows is my absolute favorite. I’m not quite as bitter as I sound, but it was late Friday night and I’m JUST tryna get to the beach, people. Arriving at Langkawi airport was seamless enough; it is a relatively compact arrival hall with just a few convenience shops near baggage claim. I saw a few cars available on my GRAB app, so I went ahead and booked a driver (LOVE GRAB – it’s always my go to, especially if you can swing it from Airports as outbound airport taxi prices are ridiculously hiked up). As is now the routine, I was greeted as always with “only yourself/one person?” Since my most recent arrival in Malaysia (only 2 weeks ago) I have been greeted with a variation of this (“only you?” “You brave girl to be traveling alone”), or even questions as to whether I am scared by being alone. Fortunately I can say thanks to a spotless history of security while traveling to many places in Indonesia and Malaysia, as well as a few others in SEA, I do feel perfectly fine, but as all the ladies out here know, it’s a completely different (and highly relevant) conversation; perhaps we can tackle that in a separate post! I arrived to my hotel for the night not quite sure where to go and figuring it was most likely closed for the night, but eventually found a reception that was open to check in. Never having traveled to Langkawi, I had no idea which part of the island was “best” to stay at, or what type of place to look for. Only staying for a few hours overnight I obviously did not want to spend much and ideally would have found a hostel, but by location, the de Baron seemed conveniently close to Kuah Jetty, where I needed to be the next morning at 8am for my ferry to Thailand!! 

Saturday morning, I was up and around at 7:30, donning only my bikini and a perhaps ill-advised neon yellow-embroidered sundress (but my favorite BIYA). Armed with my trusty Patagonia Black Hole backpack, GoPro and Canon (and chocolate), I was out the door and ready for weekend adventures. Somehow, I had what seemed the only Grab car awake on the island to my door within 4 mins, and he easily took me to Kuah Jetty (note: type in “Kuah Jetty Point” to apps like this for best recognition. I wasn’t sure exactly what to expect from this so called “Jetty”, but what greeted me was a full on ferry terminal complete with the works of retail shops and travel agents. After conceding to just drink Sbux today I began wandering (aimlessly, no – purposefully), in search of international departures. I had already booked my return ferry trip to Koh Lipe online and had my print out confirmations (probably not necessary to print btw) – so I was thinking to head straight for the ferry. I was directed to return to the entrance and go upstairs one floor to where “bowling” is (classic Malay directions…) lo and behold, this upstairs hallway (floor one, by entrance to ferry terminal) is indeed the office of Bundhaya Boat Co. (you can also ask for Tropical Cruises). At the office, I filled out my Thai arrival card and got all of the necessary paperwork and tickets squared away. Eventually, the time came to board our boat and off we went to Thailand!! The ferry trip went by quickly and comfortably enough – again, tip for quickness: if you just have a small bag, hang on to it and sit nearer to the front, which has more leg room and ensures that you’ll de board first as well, meaning you also arrive to said tropical destination sooner than later. The ride was about 1.45 hours long, which I passed with a mix of reading (What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School – highly recommended), ‘napping,’ and staring aimlessly at the passing waves through a tiny window at my side. Part of the way into the ride, a classically strange movie was turned on and I couldn’t help but pay attention at parts… it was one of those “so bizarre, weird and pointless” things that I just had to, you see. If anyone happens to know the name and/or origin of this film, they should be awarded with something – it was properly sporting computer imaging capabilities firmly set in the 80s and the plot revolved somewhere along the lines of a mortal living in Egypt who, after some tie-ins with the demigod Horus (among several others), was on the quest to rescue his (already dead) beloved from (death) walking through the nine gates of the underworld… even Anubis was involved – it got real. Sooooo, let’s just say that I was embarrassingly attached to this plot line and still never know what happened, as before I knew it, we had pulled up about 100 meters offshore from the most picture perfect tropical drop of an island I could imagine. 

Classic Thai longboats with colorful ties on the fronts docked alongside our ferry to charter small groups of passengers to the island, and once we arrived, we were charged with the task of picking up our passports from the ferry company, who keeps them in transit to hand over ashore, then obtaining an immigration stamp from the border check. Did I mention, it started POURING rain as soon as we hit ground, which only escalated into a truly Thai monsoon-style deluge. Let me just take this moment to say, those travelers hanging around with dry bags have either just done a lot of snorkeling and kayaking trips or are brilliant and well prepared. Either way, get involved with that. I got lucky, still traveling only with my Patagonia Black Hole backpack – a life saver. It zips, then folds down, then clasps… and I think it’s either waterproof or pretty damn close to it, but everything inside – including all clothing but also passport, book and camera – stayed dry! 

Somehow, a kind woman from Mountain Resort singled me out and asked if I was going there; indeed I was. I followed her to a waiting pickup truck, into the front seat of which I was invited. Upon researching (albeit barely) Koh Lipe prior to my trip, I read several reiterations of the recommendation to bring cash with you, as there are no ATMs on the island and basically no place that accepts credit card. I awkwardly kept assuming that there would be somewhere between KL and Koh Lipe, surely, where I could either withdraw or change money… false. Perhaps because I flew domestically from Langkawi and/or just wasn’t searching that hard, I never did find a place to actually get my hands on some Baht. This luckily turned out fine for me in the end, because it also turned out that the longboat trips to and from the island and our ferry were either complementary, or included in something I had already paid for, and I was able to eat all meals at my hotel, which I added onto my room bill (and they take card at reception!) Problem solved, though if you are wanting to eat at some fun local places or purchase any souvenirs or anything, really, from the shops, bars and locales along the Walking Street or at the harbor, it would indeed be helpful to have some cash. 

Though my driver could barely see and had to continuously wipe down just one spot big enough to look out of on his windshield, we somehow made it to the other side of the island to the Mountain Resort. By the time we arrived the downpour had more or less calmed to a steady trickle, and I made my way soggily into reception to check in. I was given a lovely and typically Thai welcome drink, then ushered away to my room, which was one of the “Garden Suites,” aka small hut to myself with 2 twin beds and an open-air bathroom with shower and sink in the back. Once I had settled in, which didn’t take long considering my level of luggage, I decided that the best way to explore in good old Thai rain and humidity is in a swimsuit! On went the one piece, out came the GoPro, and out I went. First I had a quick walk around the grounds of the resort to see the different style of rooms and the swimming pool. I had a quick dip in the pool but let’s be real, the reason I came was for the beach. Down I went, to one of the most tranquil and lovely beaches I had ever visited. The hotel has a few hut rooms right on the beach, as well as several lounge chairs lined up for sunbathing. I kicked off my flip flops and decided to just have a walk and see where it could take me. I walked and walked, in and out of the beautiful clear water and happy to have my toes in the sand, stopping for the occasional photo with my ridiculously long extendo-selfie stick. My walk took me down the beach, eventually past more frequent beach huts, resorts, massage huts, bars and little snorkeling, diving and adventure outposts. I continued this walk as long as I could, but came to find that it couldn’t take me clear around the island, which I figured may even be possible at first. (Later realized I’m sure it would be possible at low tide!) By the time I returned to my beach at the north tip of the island, the sun had gradually started peeking through the clouds, and the day was getting hotter by the minute. I went to the upstairs restaurant for a lunch of Thai Green Curry and Vietnamese spring rolls, overlooking sunset beach. As the clouds cleared out overhead, the hot Thai sun illuminated the island’s beauty and everything just sparkled. Different hues of blue glittered in the channel between Koh Lipe and the mountainous Koh Adang, framing the sputtering longboats as they glided along – Locals and fishermen going about their daily lives. After finishing lunch I was headed for the beach. I lathered up with my good ol 50SPF (Southeast Asian sun is something else) and plopped down in my little claimed piece of beach a few meters from the crystal clear waters lapping at the shore. There were hardly any people at all on the island to begin with, and especially not towards the north end. It was magically relaxing to have a beach more or less all to myself and just not have to worry or care about sharing space or breathing room for once with hundreds of tourists. My afternoon didn’t evolve much from there, as I only took breaks from baking in the hot sun to take a swim. I read, napped, thought… all day until eventually, noticing more and more people joining me on this particular section of beach, I realized exactly why this tip is known as sunset beach. Travelers and locals alike straggled their way over to the beach to find their spot to watch a gorgeous sunset, some just sitting contentedly, some setting up their tripods for time lapse and breaking out the selfie sticks and even a drone – it was a fantastic sunset. After everyone has meandered back home and the sun had disappeared below cotton candy clouds, I picked up my beach things and headed back home. Considering Koh Lipe isn’t exactly party central, I was completely content with an (early!) night in, after having a quick shower spent dodging mosquitoes, moths and all of the bugs that had decided to make my bathroom their evening abode, I stretched out in bed for a bit of reading time before heading to sleep. 

I either slept really damn well or my body was just revolting against “too much” weekend sleep, because I was wide awake before 7am. Greeted by warm rays of sunshine, I dragged myself out of bed and back into my bikini. I went to the hotel breakfast at Mountain Resort, and once again ate a lovely meal overlooking a surreal and idyllic scene of sparkling blue water, luscious green islands and soft white sand. After breakfast, I was back on the beach to soak up a morning of sun, and by noon I was feeling pretty crispy (my favorite, I won’t lie). Knowing that I had to show up early for passport check at the isIand’s immigration center, I packed up and arranged to be dropped off at Pattaya Beach. Once I arrived, I was given my boat ticket and told to wait about 2.5 hours to get my passport stamped and then board the ferry back to Langkawi. The strip of perfectly soft white sand was imminently tempting, so sure enough I unrolled my beach towel, lathered up with another layer of sunscreen and claimed a spot right there in front of the ferry and immigration offices. After about ten minutes and after two boatloads of new tourists arrived, it became apparent that no amount of my nonchalant reading and actively “fuck off” attitude would deter random tourists from including me in their “arrival” selfies and kicking sand as they shuffled past in chattering hordes. Ok fine, time to move. Here I was anyway, at 3pm Sunday on the most picturesque, perfect sunbathing paradise imaginable and too crispy to even stay in the sun any longer. I claimed a small patch of sand in the shade and read until our ferry arrived, and a small disheveled group of us were ushered onto a Thai longboat. Sputtering slowly out across the crystal clear waters, we pulled away from beautiful little Koh Lipe, and it was difficult to even imagine I had actually been there, and I wished I didn’t have to leave yet!

The ferry ride back to Langkawi took a bit less than two hours and was relatively seamless, spent chatting with a cute pair of American ladies who had known each other since childhood and had vowed to take at least one fun trip together every year after their children had grown up. Upon arrival, I must have been a sight because I certainly had every security officer looking me up and down like something rather strange that had washed up on shore, and the nice Malaysian man in charge of the ferry tours gave me an incredulous look as I exited security still wearing only a sarong around my waist and bikini – after being quizzed only on Katy Perry songs after the guard discovered my home is California, rather than about the contents of my bags or purpose of my visit. Get used to it. After stopping off to get the utmost basic caramel macchiato (ugh), I jumped into a taxi with surprisingly no need to haggle, and headed for the airport. I’m sure you can guess the way the rest of my weekend proceeded – it included flight, taxi, shower, email, sleeeep. What a dreamy weekend! 

The World’s Best Roadtrips – Australia’s Great Ocean Road

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Jun 10, 2017

You must do this

If you happen to ask any Aussie, particularly a Melburnian, about what things are good to do or see during your time in Oz, you’ll hear about the Great Ocean Road. Firsts things first: the GOR is in no way overrated and is perhaps even a little underrated… the views, the activities… just the experience of seeing and traveling along this magnificent stretch of Australian coastline – is unforgettable and simply unlike anything else you’ll ever see! Driving the GOR was undoubtedly one of the best road trips I’ve ever made, and one I would do again in a heartbeat.

 

So, you’re on a tight schedule

It’s ok. So was I. In fact, I only had the weekend! I’m sharing my 2 day GOR itinerary with you and what I was able to see and do, so you will at least be able to get a feel for how long everything takes and hopefully, be able to better plan your own Great Ocean adventure! I have met people that have driven down (usually this means as far as the 12 apostles or partway there), and back in one day, although I do feel that this would make for quite a rushed trip. I would recommend making at least a 2 day trip out of it, and this is certainly doable, though I also think the more time you have along this fantastic route, the better.

 

But… they’re on the wrong side of the road??

Don’t worry, we all go through this at least once. Believe it or not, I drove the entire weekend for the first time being on what is for me the wrong side of the road – and the wrong side of the car! Fortunately, with a little extra care, everything was absolutely fine, though the driving was of course an adventure in and of itself. In the interest of safety, it is of course best to only drive the route if you feel completely comfortable with driving generally, regardless of the side, as it can get quite curvy and narrow in parts. The road is completely modern and very well maintained in all areas, and quite nice to drive, with plenty of pull outs for “slow” cars, aka to let the locals pass, and well-marked corners and speed zones – keep an eye out for the well-known kangaroos ahead signs!

 

*A note on the drive: There are tons of pullout spots, so don’t worry about getting in someone’s way, and better, there are even more pullout spots at amazingly scenic spots for quick photos or leg-stretches, and the reason my trip actually took a bit longer than the prescribed times or distances you will see on Google Maps is because during the first day of our trip, I stopped at almost, if not every single one of these pullout spots, addicted to the amazing views of the powerful ocean, majestic coastline, and amazing peacefulness of the road itself. You’ll have plenty of opportunities for these, so if you miss one, don’t worry – there will be a next soon!

 

My two-day GOR itinerary 

 

Day 1:

 

Melbourne to Torqay (approx 1.5 hours) – Though it is debated where exactly the Great Ocean Road “begins,” Geelong is typically referenced as the real starting point. Given the time constraint, we decided to skip Geelong and head straight for Torqay, a seaside town most well known as the home to the National Surfing Museum, and Bells Beach. We went out to Bells Beach to a very windswept, though breathtaking, view, just long enough to watch a view hardy surfers braving the winds and cold waters, before we continued on.

 

Torqay to Lorne (45 min) – Even smaller than Torqay, Lorne is a quaint seaside town along the route, but a convenient and favorite place to stop, as well as home to a must-see; Teddy’s Lookout (about 5 min beyond Lorne center, searchable on Google Maps). Just a short drive to the top end of George Street (it may seem like you’re driving to nowhere) takes you to an amazing and majestic lookout with views of bass straight and the Great Ocean Road, winding around the cliffs. Just after visiting Teddy’s Lookout, I came across a sign for “Sheoak Falls”; as waterfall-obsessed as I am, I pulled into the designated parking lot and hiked for about 30-40 minutes down a small path, up a gulley and into the forested area until I reached a small trickling waterfall. Another 15 minutes or so beyond this and another waterfall section, visible between golden rays of sunlight and draping trees. Nothing out of NatGeo, but a beautiful and relatively easy hike. If you have the time, I would recommend doing ALL the waterfalls of GOR, but sadly I was quite short for time, so I chose my battles, but just had to follow this little path. We turned back after a while, still trying to make the 12 apostles by sunset.

 

Lorne to Apollo Bay (1 hour) – There are several key lookouts, vistas and attractions nearby to Apollo Bay, just on the eastern side of Cape Otway (lighthouse). A nice place to take a break, pull over and take some pictures along the way. We stopped for a quick lunch of grilled fish in the small town, before continuing on down the road.

 

Apollo Bay to Lavers Hill (1 hour) – this is a good route to type into Google Maps if you need to shave a bit of time off your trip or are hurrying down to the apostles as we were; this route goes inland and cuts off the Great Otway National Park portion of the GOR. To make sure you’re on the right track in case of signal loss, follow signs towards “Lavers Hill”.

 

Lavers Hill to Princetown (40 mins) – this last stretch of the drive (also up North of the Otways getting to Lavers Hill is incredibly magical, as the inland portion away from the coast takes you through an incredible jungley, rainforest-like overhang of dense, luscious greenery and tall, tall trees of all kinds, Eucalyptus included! (You are supposed to be able to spot koalas at a few key places along the GOR, though unfortunately this was one sight I missed). We were still on the approach to Princetown as the sun was rapidly descending, and wanting to make it in time to see the 12 apostles at sunset, we hurried to the parking lot (well marked) for the attraction, parking and heading out to the main viewing area. We were right in time, and caught the magnificent formations in the moody hues of a cloudy sunset. Of course, some nights are 1000% better than others, so unless you are a professional photographer waiting to get the photo for the yearly GOR calendar, you may be counting on a hit or a miss here. Of course, any sunset at the 12 apostles is going to be unforgettable and magical, so I would still recommend it. Alternatively, you could opt for sunrise, which arguably does light up the apostles themselves much better, as the sun is then shining from the proper direction.

 

Overnight: as I decided upon and booked the trip rather last minute, there was not an overwhelming abundance of accommodation options around the area. I figured in the end that if anything, the trade off between comfort/amenities and access to the apostles may be a worthy compromise, so I found the “hotel” as close as possible to the apostles; it turned out to be down a driveway actually connected to the viewing area parking lot! The Twelve Apostles Motel & Country Retreat is an intriguing experience, to say the least, and was one of the many pieces that made for an absolutely unforgettable (and at times, laughable) weekend. Driving down Booringa road seems like you’re just trying to find an abandoned barn and then get lost even more, but have faith and functional car headlights, and you’ll find it eventually. The small yard we pulled into seemed only slightly out of a horror film, with only slightly creepy dwarves and figurines jutting crookedly out of the grass amongst the sparse trees, a sign on the “office” door telling new visitors to pick up the phone receiver for service after hours. This is one of the those places I suppose you would joke about never wanting to show up after dark, and then of course when do you think you show up…? Eventually, a slightly odd but friendly woman bustled out to greet us and hand us our room key, with directions to one of the rooms behind the tree line. We drove out further, parked the car and made our way into our little abode for the evening. If retreating into the countryside – way, way into it – is the kind of vibe you’re going for, this is the place for you. Each little bungalow thingy forms a glorified trailer park, with worn out amenities but still, I couldn’t complain at a shower (actually with hot water), a warm blanket, and a functioning heater (it gets cold out here at night!) We made our camp for the night, snuggling into the strange little house and laughing at the circumstance, simply happy to be in the experience. Luckily, we had brought plenty of leftovers from our dinner the night previous in Melbourne, because the best that this motel can offer at the time was a sadly worn cup of microwave noodles (I think), and the area itself is not exactly popping. Note to self, bring food in and don’t rely on having much more than a microwave, and/or make dinner or accommodation plans in a bigger town on ahead, like Port Campbell.

 

Day 2:

 

After a morning visit back to the apostles to see them in stronger daylight, we continued our journey, knowing that this time it would take us back to Melbourne. Wanting to see a bit more of the coast and a few key attractions, we headed first down the road towards Port Campell, stopping a short 10-15 minutes away to see the Loch Ard Gorge. The gorge is named after the clipper ship “Loch Ard,” which ran aground on a nearby island in 1878, nearly at the end of a 3-month long journey from England to Melbourne. Supposedly this particular passage was so dangerous that it claimed many ships during those years. There were only two survivors from the Loch Ard; a 19 year old ship’s apprentice and a 19 year old Irish woman, emigrating with her family, who was stuck in the waters and rescued by the ship’s apprentice, who then climbed out of the gorge to call for help. Being inside the gorge is both eery and impressive, with massive waves crashing thorugh the narrow entrance and swelling into the gorge. I couldn’t imagine having to climb out, so I was definitely glad there is a well-built staircase to enter and leave the gorge. Since my visit, I have seen a few photos of people swimming and sunbathing down in the gorge; it looks simply magical when the sun shines down and lights up the clear blue waters – if you’ve been to my insta page, you can see that it is a bit more dismal when cloudy, but still impressive. Driving the GOR in middle of hot, sunny summer is definitely on my bucket list, with plenty of time to pull over and swim, sunbathe and explore.

 

We next drove along the coast south of Port Campbell and stopped to have a quick breakkie (of smashed avo toast with feta and rocket, of course), at a little café overlooking an inlet. A few brave visitors were gearing up for a morning swim, which I felt was far too brave for my style of only swimming if the water, or weather, or both – are quite warm. After breakfast we drove on a bit further down the coast to see London Bridge, a popular scenic view over another “apostle-like” rock formation out in the ocean which used to be connected to the other rocks by a small bridge-like formation. Aka “London Arch,” the formation used to form a complete double span bridge, until in 1990 a sudden unexpected collapse of the span connecting the rock to land left two surprised tourists out on the water-bound section, to be rescued by helicopter. During our visit, it was just a tourst hot spot, with loud groups of Chinese tours vying for the best photo op. Needless to say, it was lovely, but we didn’t hang around too long after taking a few photos and admiring the view, as once again we wanted to conserve time when possible.

 

Back to Melbourne: We continued back the other way, counting the “kangaroo ahead” signs that we passed and once again, admiring the amazing variation of landscapes along the impressive coastal stretch. Knowing that we wouldn’t have time to do everything we wanted along the route, we decided to see two main attractions on the way back to Melbourne while we still had the daylight:

 

Otway Fly Treetop Adventures: Just north of Cape Otway National Park along Colac Lavers Hill Rd, Otway Fly is a park offering hiking along a metal, 25- meter high treetop walk that stretches for 600 meters throughout the dense canopy of the leafy green trees. It only takes about an hour to complete at a comfortable pace and is easily accessible for all ability and fitness levels; some people even brought their strollers along. Otway Fly also offers an “Eco Zip Line Tour,” which takes about 2.5 hours, during which you zip from tree to tree for a more exhilarating experience of the diverse unique flora and fauna in the Otways! Sadly, our time was too tight for the zip line, but maybe someday. Random tip, look out for the trees along the road on the way into the park that totally look like broccoli.

 

Triplet Falls: Very near to Otway Fly Treetop park, Triplet Falls is recognized (according to my research, anyway) as one of the most beautiful and popular falls to visit along the GOR. Of course, I would love more than anything to spend time hiking out to each and every one, though by looking into it a bit, I discovered that some of the very best are indeed a several hour-long hike in and out, so given the time availability and proximity, it made the most sense to visit Triplet for this trip. Follow Google Maps and signs down a shaded curvy road into beautiful dense forest, and eventually you will reach a small parking lot with the entrance to the falls. There are actually several ways to hike down of course, and separate paths leading to different falls and destinations. I hiked the loop, which entails turning slightly left from the parking lot and following signs to Triplet Falls; if you start out by going down a TON of stairs, this is the right track. Alternatively, you can go down by the way I came back up, which is behind the parking lot down to the right- this will take significantly less, even half the time of the other path and gets you directly down to the falls. If you have time and are willing to hit some stairs for the exercise (nothing too bad, I promise), I would recommend the loop anyway because you go through the most beautiful forest and honestly, you just feel like a little magical rainforest jungle fairy – ok, I did. You will start seeing small streamlets and offshoots of the falls before you actually reach them, so keep going – and once you get there, the only sad bit is that there is a viewing podium quite far from the falls themselves, and it would take a fair bit of time to figure out how to make it down any closer to the falls themselves. After spending some time observing the beautiful falls, we continued hiking, following a steeper set of stairs (but fewer), passing by even an old abandoned steam engine! Amazing to think that loggers used to frequent the area, and somehow pull out huge pieces of timber from the steep hillside.

 

A1 Princes Highway to Melbourne: After visiting the falls, the brightest part of the day was already speeding past us, and so we made the decision to head up inland a bit to shave some time off of our trip home, thinking that driving along the coast would lose most of its charm in the dark, anyway. We headed towards Colac as a maps destination in order to connect to the A1, or Princes Highway, which is basically a straight shot back into Melbourne. During our drive home, I made the lovely and rather hilarious discovery that wearing my glasses at night magically allow me to see properly (DUH), after struggling to read the fuzzy street signs at night (I’m a safe driver, I promise). After an adventure and beauty-packed weekend of driving, we pulled back into Melbourne to reminisce about all of the amazing sights we had experienced, and revel in the pure beauty that Australia relentlessly surprises us with.

Adventure to Rottnest Island – Things you must see in Western Australia

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Mar 21, 2017

The inspiration for my trip to Rottnest Island began with a single jaw-dropping Instagram post of a bubblegum-pink lake, geotagged to be somewhere in Western Australia. My initial disbelief spiraled into an obsession to find the pink lakes of western Australia myself. After a few internet searches, I quickly discovered that the only pink lakes within reach of Perth existed to the north and south of Perth, each about 6-8 hours away by car. Knowing that I would only be in Perth for one week and unable to take a day to drive, I realized visiting these spots would have to go on my bucket list for another time (alongside tons of other amazing spots along the coast of WA – will definitely be back!) Eventually, a Google Maps search showed a pin on a small island off the coast of Perth; there seemed to be a “pink lake” on Rottnest Island! While countless blogs and travel websites mention the pink lakes of WA that I had found initially, I could not find any such description of those on the so-called Rottnest Island. Regardless, photos online of the island itself convinced me that it would be a gorgeous place to visit for the day, and so I decided I would go.

 

Lo and behold, Monday morning I woke up to a clouded and gloomy gray sky which only got darker by the minute. Despite the looming clouds, I made up my mind to not let a little bad weather get in the way of my adventures, so I headed out to the ferry terminal at Fremantle, one of three possible locations from which ferries leave to Rottnest (Fremantle being the shortest trip). I was questioning my decision to go ahead when some Perth locals on my ferry lamented what horrible weather they were having and what a shame I was seeing the island on a day like this… and when we caught air, bouncing clear off of our seats when we hit some of the bigger waves. The locals next to me told me a bit about the island, and about a local annual swimming competition, which runs 20km from the harbor to the island, through the open ocean!

 

Once I arrived to Rottnest, the day had already begun to brighten, with some of the clouds parting to allow little rays of sunshine through. I was instantly happier and so glad that I went ahead and chose to visit the island. I immediately headed for “Pedal and Flipper,” the most commonly-frequented bike rental shop on the island with a large garage full of bikes of all sizes. Once I had grabbed a helmet and bike, I was on my way. Not knowing how much of the island I would be able to cover before I had to turn in my bike by 5:00, I figured I would just explore as much as possible. The hope of seeing a pink lake was still fresh, so I went ahead and set off on my bike, with Google Maps pointing me somewhere towards the middle of the main part of the island. Once I headed down the central Digby Road, I didn’t have to bike very far before I came across a stunning sight: on my right, a deep blue body of water with – PINK around the edges! I had suddenly been plopped right into a fairytale, with wispy palm trees and cotton candy lakes, and I was loving every minute. The beginning of Digby Road is where I took most of my pictures, and as I continued along this road, the lakes only got pinker! As I learned from an oh-so-helpful billboard, the lakes get their (crazy) pink color from microscopic algae that grows on salt crystals, containing beta-carotene, a reddish orange substance that is partly responsible for the color. The pink lakes (also known as the salt lakes) are four times saltier than seawater, which reasonably attracts such a high concentration of the beta-carotene-bearing algae.

 

Tearing myself away from selfie upon selfie, I continued my ride and had an amazing day riding all over this beautiful little island off the coast of Perth. As I came to find out along my ride around Rottnest (Wadjemup to the local Noongar people, or simply “Rotto” to most locals), is well known for its significant population of quokkas! In case you don’t know, quokkas are (THE CUTEST AND CUDDLIEST) small native marsupials that appear to be something in between a large rodent and small cat-rabbit? The little guys of Rotto are either quite accustomed to visitors or just not shy, because they will indeed come right on over to check you out for any leftover snacks or just for a bit of a snuggle. Other wildlife of the island consists of many rare species of birds (you will see many trails indicating good places to spot these from, often pathways where bikes cannot go), and both Australian sea lions and southern fur seals, which you can spot frolicking and fishing off the shore of Rotto along the rocky coast.

 

Once I had ridden into central island in hot pursuit of the pink lakes, I decided to head to the north and skirt the border of the island counter-clockwise and try to make it all the way around to the east coast by the time I needed to return my bike. I passed bays, cliffs, beaches and rocky outcroppings by what seemed the dozen (there are something around 60+ bays surrounding the island!) and stopped to take pictures or wander down to most of them. Each and every place was spectacularly unique, and I could just imagine claiming a spot of the soft white sand for my very own during one of the hot hot days that Rotto is known for. A good book, the beach and crystal clear turquoise waters create the perfect recipe for an amazing vacation, staycation for Perthites, and anything in between. The second half of my day was filled with a bit more huffing and puffing, as I tried to cover as much ground as possible in between stopping to admire the views. Once I made it out to Cape Vlamingh, I only had about an hour left. Cape Vlamingh is at the westerly tip of the island and is home to a wildlife/eco sanctuary, which remains protected by a 200 meter boardwalk running out to the point, allowing visitors to enjoy the breathtaking views beyond the edge of the island.

 

After soaking in the amazing views at the west end, I took off again down the coast and made my last main stop before turning back to the central path back to the east coast; The Green Island. I am not entirely sure where this beach bay got its name, perhaps from the small rocks lining the coast. I was greeted by a group of five exuberantly jumping Indonesian bikers, all dressed for the occasion in neon yellow biking gear. I had missed this typical and familiar photo-on-a-tropical-beach-somewhere experience in Indonesia, where anyone with remotely blonde hair is bombarded for group photos with up to thirty people at a time. After we took our peace signs and smiley photos together and wished each other well, I enjoyed the peace of the beach and full force of the natural beauty of this remote paradise before jumping on my bike and pedaling my way back to the other coast.

 

I cannot even describe my experience at Rotto adequately… and I went on a cloudy, dreary day in comparison! I know that I simply must go back someday, and I would love at least one week to explore; just getting on my bike every morning, and riding where and when I want, seeing, feeling and experiencing the raw beauty of the happy little island. I recommend you do the same, and don’t forget to cuddle a quokka!

 

Stay wild xxx

New Zealand’s most amazing natural wonders – down the rabbit hole at Waiotapu Thermal Wonderland

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Mar 6, 2017

Have YOU ever fallen down the rabbit hole? How about one that ends in boiling pools of neon yellow goop? If this sounds up your alley, head on out to Rotorua, New Zealand. Let’s talk about Waiotapu – what does it mean? Waiotapu is a maori word meaning “sacred waters,” and is an active geothermal area at the southern area of the Okataina Volcanic Center in New Zealand’s Taupo Volcanic Zone. Thermal – indeed, quite self-explanatory. Wonderland – aptly titled, because between the unsettling and unnatural (but 1000% natural!) colors, the 100 degree+ temperatures (Celsius) and the crazy landscapes, this beauty will have you feeling like Alice for sure… perhaps after the “eat me, drink me” encounter.

 

There is no shortage of beautiful wonders to see at Waiotapu, so I would allow at least 2 hours for your visit, if not a bit more. If you’re up for an early start, the Lady Knox Geyser (allegedly) awakens every morning at 10:15AM (unfortunately I visited in the afternoon, so cannot confirm this lovely experience but am hoping to see it next time!) The park is well-landscaped with clearly defined paths for visitors, and plenty of signs indicating where really not to step or leave the indicated path given the high temperatures of the ground and steam coming out of the thermal caves. Visitors are able to choose which path (of three main options) they wish to follow, namely a shorter track (walk 1) that takes you to the main attractions of the Central Pools and Champagne Pool, a middle ground (walk 1 & 2) offering some additional sights, and then the full extended trek (walk 1, 2, & 3), which, while not at all more difficult or arduous, provides so many surprises along the way and an unforgettable end view. Estimated lengths and times of walk 1 is 1.5km, 30 min; walk 2 is 2km and should take 40 min, while walk 3 is 3km and should take about 75 min. I was unsure which path to take at first because the guides in the welcome center sound rather ambivalent but say of course it’s all very interesting, may as well go all the way for some additional nice photos… but if you take away anything from this writing, do the full circuit walk!!! It. Is. Amazing. And so SO worth it. My last minute decision to do the entire path because (why not, I was already there) turned out to be an excellent choice, and once you complete the first half with main attractions, a significant chunk of tourists with their impending selfie sticks have already circled back for the entrance, leaving you alone to wander amongst the nature alone with your thoughts, camera (ok, perhaps a selfie stick of your own), and some really breathtaking views.

 

What you’ll see

Along any walk you choose, you will pass a huge variety of wonders, including thermal caves spewing steam, bubbling ominously from their depths, and a lovely sulfuric smell… yum. All of these caves and pools you will see throughout the course of the day are results of time, and location in one of the most active volcanic areas in the world. Here are some of the park’s highlights, and my favorites:

 

Artist’s Palette: After earthquakes caused the Champagne Pool to tilt, mineral laden water flowed over the flat, causing this multicolored display of chemical beauty. Orange, bright yellows and surreal greens and blues paint across the water as mineral deposits are spread around by the wind.

 

Champagne Pool: arguably the most famous attribute of Waiotapu, the Champagne Pool occupies a crater that was formed during an eruption 700 years ago! Purportedly the most violent eruption that the world has seen in the past 5,000 years, ash was seen as far away as the skies of Europe and China. What’s going on to make it these crazy colors, you may ask… let alone the “champagne”-esque bubbles? Well, let’s just say there’s some knarly chemistry going on, to say the least.

            For my science buffs: the water enters the pool at a temp of 230 degrees Celsius and cools within the pool to around 74 degrees, with a pH of 5.4, making it slightly acidic. The gas bubbles rising to the surface are C02, the orange colored edge containing arsenic and antimony sulfur compounds rich in minerals including gold and silver.

 

Lake Ngakoro: This is the enormous, stunning lake that greets deserving visitors at the end of their trek (on the long walk). Crisply turquoise, the lake lures one into its beautiful depths. Take your time just looking, soaking in the beauty, and enjoy life for a moment.

 

Devil’s Bathtub: The most intriguing (perhaps most disturbing) feature of Waiotapu may in fact be its most tranquil (in terms of chemistry and volcanic activity, anyway). Also sitting in a crater caused by eruption likely centuries ago, the stagnant liquid of Devil’s Bathtub is an astonishingly (anyone have a better word?!) neon yellow/green, resulting from sulfur deposits that rise to its surface. LOVELOVELOVE. Stay wild, Waiotapu- seriously.

 

Mud Pool

Ok, you’ve seen all the craziness that nature has to offer. You’ve seen 100 degree steam rising from a bright green pool, a small lake properly comparable only to Gatorade, and wonder upon wonder of geothermal amazement. Stop right there. You simply cannot drive away from Waiotapu without first driving just beyond their main parking area… back towards the signs pointing out “Mud Pools.” A visit to Waiotapu simply would not be complete without seeing Rotorua’s famous boiling mud. It’s just as magical as it sounds, I promise. Go ahead, I dare you to jump in (just kidding, please don’t. As one of the kind fellows that welcomed us implored, “if you want to keep your legs, please refrain.”) The mud occupies the site of a once-volcano which eroded in the 1920s, leaving a rather mysterious and captivating pit of bubbling and boiling goo (which, by the way, is the source of many luxurious cosmetic products including a killer face mask!). Laugh, point, take some pics… try to predict when the next big bubble will come- that’s all, folks.

 

Whether you’re traveling NZ solo or bringing the whole fam damily, this place is MAGICAL, and you need to go. Now. Go see these whimsical wonders and feel your jaw drop- dayum, Mother Nature.

 

 

*Getting there: Waiotapu is more or less smack in the middle of New Zealand’s north island, and nearly equidistant from Taupo and Rotorua. I visited Waiotapu en route from Wellington to Auckland via a night over in Taupo- a quick drive down “Thermal Explorers’ highway” is accessible and easy the next morning. From my experience, having a car to see around NZ is simply preferable, because you avoid uncertainty, get to see all of these tucked-away places, and of course, can see what you want, when and how and you travel on your own terms. J

A Breath of Fresh Air – Escape the Concrete Jungle for a day at Zealandia

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Feb 28, 2017

A quick 15 minute drive from downtown Wellington, Zealandia Ecosanctuary is an oasis amongst the craziness of Wellington city, and a welcome reprieve from the weekly grind. The history and story behind Zealandia is intriguing; as the world’s first fully-fenced urban ecosanctuary, it has reintroduced 18 species of native wildlife back into the area, 6 of which were previously absent from mainland New Zealand for over 100 years. This all in line with their extraordinary mission to restore Wellington’s valley forest and freshwater ecosystems as closely as possible to their pre-human state.

 

The fence of Zealandia allows a remarkably rare blend of birds, reptiles, insects and more to thrive and flourish, living wild within a ruggedly gorgeous jungle valley stretching across one square mile. Keep your eyes peeled, and your camera at the ready, as you never know when you will confront a red-beaked Takahē sidling along down the path (I never did, sadly). Don’t get me started on the insects… let’s just say you most likely hope you do not have any run-ins with these knarly dudes (how do insects that big even exist?!)

 

After being plopped into one urban jungle after another (and loving it of course), I always jump at the chance to immerse myself in some real nature, even if just for a little while. Walking through this wonderland of green, sweet silence punctuated only by breezes and a wild symphony of bird calls and insect humming, watching the sunlight stream through feathery ferns – I could stay here for hours.. and hours. You may want to! Whether you are a seasoned bird watcher or a Wellington drop-by visitor, Zealandia has something for you – there are many different pathways and combinations thereof, so you can make your trek as long, short, challenging or relaxing as you like, and just revel in the pure loveliness of this very true sanctuary.

 

Find more info about the park at http://visitzealandia.com

 

STAY WILD xxx