WILDTHG TRAVEL

Liechtenstein is tiny, and randomly really cool

by , on
Nov 28, 2018

I’m currently based in Zürich and had a few days’ off of work for the All Saints’ Day long holiday. I had never been to Liechtenstein (is that a thing?) and so figured why not! I didn’t really know that much about this tiny landlocked nation before visiting – I knew there was a Prince and had heard about it being a friendly billionaire tax-haven. After spending a few days in this country, sandwiched between Switzerland and Austria, I can attest to it being absolutely lovely, and very worth a visit.

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downtown Vaduz, Liechtenstein

To get to the capital city, Vaduz, I took a train from Zürich HB to Sargans, right on the Swiss border and then a bus to Vaduz, Post (quite central). The commute was stunning and I could hardly stop filming out the window – leaving Switzerland, the train passed Walensee with its beautiful turquoise color and quaint sailboats bobbing in the wind, and then once I switched to the bus, the scenery switched to magnificent snowcapped alps. The entire trip only took about 1.5 hours , which was very reachable and even more convenient than several trips I’ve taken within Switzerland!

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Views from the train en route to Vaduz

As it turns out, Vaduz is basically all things pleasant about cute European cities – quaint, pleasantly walkable, nice restaurants, (very) artsy, clean, organized, and photogenic. Not having known what to expect before going, I was pleasantly surprised and certainly happy that I went ahead and made the trip.

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Not knowing exactly where the most poppin part of town was when I made an extremely last minute booking, I ended up in a hotel just across the town border in Triesen (only about 20 min walk from downtown Vaduz). The Meierhof Hotel was super comfy, snuggly and the perfect little nest for a few days of exploring Vaduz.

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View from our room at Hotel Maierhof (technically in Triesen)

I only spent one night in Liechtenstein and for two partial days of exploring, feel that I saw Vaduz fairly thoroughly. I started with a delicious Italian lunch at Amarone, then headed to see Schloss Vaduz (Vaduz Castle), the current permanent residence of the Prince of Liechtenstein and family.

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Pasta, raviolis and locally-brewed beer at amarone in downtown Vaduz

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view from a lookout point on the walking path up to Vaduz Castle from downtown (if you look closely, you can spot Red House on the right hand side of the photo!!)

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vaduz castle

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You will see several of these “no drones” signs throughout Vaduz but particularly closer to the castle – out of safety and privacy for the princely family

After stalking the Prince for a while, I continued on through the old part of Vaduz to the Red House, which was built in 1338 and is famous mostly for its color but has also passed ownership various times throughout the years and centuries… as one would hope.

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The famous “Red House” of Vaduz

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View of Schloss Vaduz from Red House (across the vineyard forming the Red House’s backyard)

Walking down from the Red House through the old town (Mitteldorf area of Vaduz) was very peaceful and the perfect place to experience a gorgeous sunset, with quaint vineyards of Red House and other small abodes in the foreground and Vaduz Castle, standing in front of impressive alpine peaks as a backdrop to purple billowing clouds.

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By the time sun had set, my exploring day had just about come to an end and I made it my mission to stop only twice on the way back to the hotel – at the chocolate shop Dolce, (you need this chocolate in your life) and at the Mövenpick wine store (also has wine-tasting available!). I actually made three stops by mistake, as I ended up buying shoes on the way home (eye roll) – they are warm comfy boots, how can you go wrong?!

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Chocolates and Nusstorte from Dolce and some red wine for a lovely evening in

After a solid night’s sleep and a lovely breakkie at Hotel Meierhof, I set out for exploring day 2, but with a different agenda in mind. I headed directly for Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, the 10 year old modern and contemporary art museum that houses a thoroughly interesting collection, largely comprising of the provate collection of the Principality of Liecthtenstein. The architecture of the building itself is quite renown for its “great structural complexity and and discreet simplicity,” built by Swiss architects and contributing significantly to the overall aesthetic of this central pedestrian street of Vaduz.

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Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein (Museum of Modern Art)

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unique art lining the streets of the old town

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something tells me I won’t be able to fit these babies into my luggage…

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At the time of my visit, the featured exhibition was Yuri Albert’s Elitist Democratic Art. This exhibition is the Russian-born artist’s first comprehensive solo exhibit outside of Russia. [In this series the artist contrasts the language of art with the languages of blind or deaf people or also the terminology of sailors and stenographers in order to analyse the individual semiotic systems and the system of art as a whole, their comprehensibility and accessibility. The museum visitor is always an interlocutor in these studies of the relationship between artwork and interpretation, image and text, visibility and invisibility, original and copy. Yuri Albert’s works draw us into a dialogue with and about art, inviting us to ponder the status of art: elitist or democratic.]

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“Arbat in the morning” by Yuri Albert

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meant to be read by the blind

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meant to be read by stenographers

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“how did it occur that I made this particular artwork in this particular style?”

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Yuri Albert’s collection of pieces dedicated to “who he is not” as an artist

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“I am not Andy Warhol”

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After absorbing (or not understanding anything as likely intended this time) of the delicous modern art, I set about buying a few souveneirs with my last hours in Liechtenstein. I visited the main souvenier shop that was open, as Hoi was closed for the public holiday. For souvenir hunters, you needn’t look further than this pedestrian walk, as the Landesmuseum Liechtenstein also has a unique selection, and further up the road, Nimrod AG turns the “traditional to fashionable” with dirndls and lederhosen – Oktoberfest plans, anyone??

For the museum fanatics, there are multiple museums precisely in this area of Vaduz, including the Landesmuseum (country history), Postmuseum (post office, stamps and related history) and various others. I was super content with my dose of contemporary and modern art in the morning, and after grabbing a cold Alpenlager at my hotel, was ready to head out for a leisurely return to Zürich.

Overall – Liechtenstein is just precious. Would I prioritize coming back every year? – maybe not, but if you’re wondering whether it is “worth” visiting (on a super packed Eurotrip, for example), I would say it is! If you are in the area and it is relatively convenient and not extremely expensive to get to, I would 100% recommend this tiny and fabulous mountain nation.

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LIECHTENSTEIN IN A FLASH:

Where to stay: Hotel Maierhof

What to do: Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz Castle, Walk through old town (downtown), Red House

Where to eat/drink: Local vineyards, Mövenpick Wine Outlet, Dolce, Amarone

 

 

 

 

Why You Must Visit GOMA This Summer – An Insider’s Look at Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art

by , on
Feb 14, 2017

Brisbane’s renowned Gallery of Modern Art is turning 10!! Happy Birthdayyyyy to GOMA! Several striking exhibits are claiming a home at GOMA for the celebration, and they are not only incredible, intellectual and meaningful, but pure fun – I visited GOMA twice within one week in Brisbane and would keep going back and back to see (and hear!) more of this unique museum.

 

Sugar Spin – You, Me, Art, and Everything

Headlining the celebrations of GOMA’s 10th birthday is the exhibit ‘Sugar Spin,’ featuring over 250 contemporary artworks exploring light, space, architecture and the senses. Large scale and immersive works invite visitors to interact with and appreciate these incredible works of art that fully plunge one into an exploration of our complex connection with the natural world. An effort to reach deeper understanding of the art leads one into meaningful discovery, while the installations themselves are necessarily fantastic and fun even superficially. Here are some of my favorite experiences of Sugar Spin:

 

Stroke the furry wall:

Entering GOMA, I was immediately confronted by an expansive FURRY WALL-literally. This thing crawls up the wall to a height of about 15 meters, and it looks a bit like Monsters, Inc. exploded everywhere inside the museum. Aka, IT IS F*@#ING AMAZINGGG. Go stroke the furry wall, just get involved. Snuggle it, cuddle it, pet it… whatever you feel like, but just enjoy it! This oasis of happiness is made of multicolored synthetic hair (a lot of it), by Icelandic artist Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir (Shoplifter) and is titled Nervescape V. Bright, strange, immersive and even grotesque, this fuzzy phenomenon will draw you in and keep you for a while, if nothing else for some of the best insta pics you’ll ever take.

 

Be a bird watcher for the day:

A room on the second floor of GOMA has been reserved solely for one of the most peculiar and lovely exhibits of GOMA’s 10th birthday- the finch room. This live work is the magic of artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot, who initially trained as a musician and composer before turning his hand to the visual art, perhaps the clear impetus for this very sonically-oriented work. The cheerful chirping of colorful finches, flitting back and forth between wire hangars and little wooden boxes, permeates a mellow soundscape, creating a meditative and pleasant sound and surrounding. I could have spent hours in here, mesmerized by the beauty of the birds and the sound itself; this artist knew what he was creating indeed.

 

Sleep with giants:

WOAH- wait, what?! This was more or less my initial reaction when walking into the exhibit room hosting In Bed, by Ron Mueck. A life sized (psh-NO-bigger, much bigger than life-sized!!!) woman lies in a bed on the floor and I swear she just watches you as you approach her. Is she content, tired, troubled… even pained? Not quite sure, and neither is anyone else. The plaque explaining the work actually examines these very questions, and comments on how the realistic nature of the work allows the viewer to perhaps interpret the work as they will, but leaves the true nature of the woman’s mood a mystery. Let’s just say it’s incredible, but I wouldn’t want to be alone with this one after hours… let’s not relive Night at the Museum.

 

Wheeeeee! Meet you at the bottom!

Slide down one of two tube slides that connect the third floor to the lobby – c’mon, you know you want to. Just don’t be carrying your cameras or pet poodles- they won’t let you on with too many loose objects. Artist Carsten Höller is behind this installation, with a purpose to reexamine expectations about art, i.e. what place does a giant slide have in a serious art museum?? Well, who cares. It’s awesome.

 

Sensory overload:

 

Stare into the depths of Anish Kapoor’s works – either the giant red circular piece, occupying its own room on the gallery floor – or his more minimal blue piece in the same room as a giant dragonlike snake skeleton, alongside several other striking works.

 

Dance with magical horses:

Immerse yourself in Herd, the fantastical group of horses brought to life in a backdrop video and through human performance. This vibrant room is brought to life by sculptor and performance artist Nick Cave, and is one to spend some moments in. Walk down the rows and look closely; each horse is so unique and beautiful, and just from a short glance, I experienced so many different observations of the art, from interpretation to feeling and even noticing how the different fabrics of the horses’ headdresses are reminiscent of several specific cultures.

 

Revisit your childhood love of LEGOs!

On the top floor of the gallery, thousands of white Lego pieces have been joined by visitors to form and reform an imaginary and spectacular cityscape; you can place the Legos however you wish and can build any shape or structure that you want, thus creating and re-creating the idea of cities in Olafur Eliasson’s interactive The cubic structural evolution project.

Go on, check out GOMA and wish it a Happy Birthday while you’re at it! Summer is a fantastic time to visit, but Sugar Spin is amazingly worth the visit. (Ok, ok, I am indeed overly obsessed with the giant technicolor fuzzy wall, but WHO ISN’T?!) This place is on Trip Advisor’s top ten list for a reason, but that doesn’t make it a tourist trap. If you are remotely interested in art or just want to have some fun with a few hours in Brisvegas, I would highly recommend a visit.

 

I would love to hear in your comments below about your own experiences at GOMA or how you feel it compares to other modern art houses, and what your favorite aspect of art and museum viewing in a foreign place is; what is the meaning of traveling to see art for you? Is it meaning, experience, visual, or something else?