WILDTHG TRAVEL

A Weekend Getaway at the Mountain Resort, Koh Lipe, Thailand

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Jul 9, 2017

Koh Lipe is a secret paradise in and of itself, and on the north most tip of the island, practically with its own private beach, is perched yet another paradise – the Mountain Resort.

 

After arriving to Koh Lipe by traditional Thai longboat in a sudden downpour, I was happily to drag my soggy self into a comfortable room in one of the several “garden villa huts” at Mountain Resort. In my room were two twin beds, both clean and well-made, classically decorated with Thai colors and fabrics. The furniture was minimal and tasteful, and the bathroom and shower were outdoors but walled within my room, separated from my bedroom by a sliding door (which later proved extremely helpful in keeping away unwanted mozzy visitors).

 

There are a number of different accommodation options at the resort, from hut-style single-bedroom villas to raised huts on stilts down on the beach, through to more condo-style, concrete and glass rooms within a larger cluster. All have nearly equally-stunning views of either the luscious green surroundings, the ocean, the neighboring islands, or all of the above. Some of the rooms would have a fantastic sunset view, along with their own little rooftop balcony areas (romantic getaway, anyone?)

 

What to do: If you came to the island to lay in the sun and read all day (cough cough), well you’re in luck – the beach is your backyard. If you came to go on wild snorkeling adventures, Mountain Resort provides all the gear you need, just visit the little shack down by the beach, down the staircase from the restaurant and check in building; you can easily float just off the shore and spot various underwater life amongst the coral reefs. The beach next to Mountain Resort is the one that shows up in so many Google images of Koh Lipe – the one that juts out and becomes a bit wider and circular right at the end, lending an oxford comma to the sea. Aptly referred to as “Sunset Beach,” this spot provides an excellent view for amazing, deep orange and red sunsets.

 

If you for some reason get sick of being at the beach (on a tiny tropical island that you decided to come to)… Mountain Resort has got a lovely, turquoise blue swimming pool that also has a pretty impressive view of the sea, so you have the option to float around here for a while, or alternate between ocean and pool.

 

What/How to eat: Granted, there’s not tons of food floating around Koh Lipe, even as it is becoming slightly more touristy as time goes on. There are a few warungs and of course, a mix of backpackers’ hostels through to hotels and resorts scattered along the main stretch of beach, but otherwise not the type of place that you can roll up expecting whatever dish may tickle your fancy. Luckily, my laziness for the weekend was reinforced by delicious food, right at the Mountain Resort’s restaurant. The continental breakfast that was included in the room was quite typical for Thailand and Asian hotels, serving up the usual variety of Asian hot and western warm, cold or somewhere in between dishes. Fruit, cereal, coffee… there are plenty of small snacks for those looking to grab a light breakfast in lieu of traditional noodles before hitting the beach. It almost wouldn’t matter what you choose to eat, because the entire experience is made by the simply astounding view from the restaurant, out over the sparkling blues of the water and onto the neighboring Koh Adang.

 

I came to Koh Lipe for a quiet, relaxing and tropical getaway, unperturbed as possible by traffic, noise and even internet-connectedness. While the resort has WiFi, the vibe (and slow nature of all connection due to the island’s remoteness) gives a perfect excuse to unplug, throw on your swimsuit, grab a book, your flippers and head for the beach. Mountain Resort, tucked away and significantly removed from any other accommodation spots on the entire island, provides just one more added layer of privacy and luxury to an already magical place.

 

 

 

 

36 HOURS IN SAIGON – Exploring Ho Chi Minh in a Weekend

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Jul 8, 2017

Ho Chi Minh was my first introduction to the beautiful country of Vietnam; as the largest city in Vietnam, I chose to visit HCMC first and experience its hustle and bustle, food, culture, history, and all that contributes to create such a vibrant and interesting city.

 

Day One

 

I arrived into HCMC Saturday morning after a sleepy 1.5 hour flight from KL, waking up to a turbulent and cloudy landing, just as our plane glided over the rooftops of waves upon waves of houses – my first glance of the city. I had already arranged everything for my visa (online application prior to traveling required) and so I went to the windows to turn in all materials necessary (application papers, 4×6 photo and $25USD) and eventually received my passport back, visa inside. After getting through immigration, I arranged a taxi at one of the many small counters inside, which was prepaid at 220,000 VND (Dong). I had read that a taxi from airport should cost around 160,000, but these counters all charged the same so I assumed the price had perhaps increased since, though in retrospect, as Grab is available in HCMC, it may have been possible to get onto the airport free WiFi and Grab, which would have been presumably cheaper (next time).

 

It took about 30-45 minutes to drive into the city, and I arrived around 10:30AM at my hotel, the Liberty Central Saigon Riverside. My room as reserved was not yet ready but I was informed that I could already have a 2 bedroom that overlooked the river, so I checked in and got settled. Before heading out to explore, I had a glance at the rooftop pool, which also overlooks the Song Sai Gon river, with expansive views of all the barges, cruises and everything else floating along.

 

Needing breakfast, I grabbed my laptop and headed just 3 minutes around the corner to The Workshop Café, on Dhong Koi street. I’ve made it my goal to at least find one funky hipster café in each new urban destination that I visit, and was able to immediately check that off my list after a delicious breakkie of eggs benedict and coffee at The Workshop. After walking up a few flights of stairs in what seems like a derelict building, I was greeted by a cozy, creative nook of a space with a central coffee bar and overhanging lamps throughout. Inside is a mix of long communal work tables and separate small tables for ones or twos.

Sleepy, but well fed and happy, I dropped my laptop back at my hotel and was ready to explore. I had downloaded an offline Google Map of the city and so getting around wasn’t a problem – I set off for the War Remnants Museum first, feeling that as such an important reminder of Vietnam’s painful history and a true must-see while in HCMC, I would start with this museum and take as long as needed there. The walk took about 30 minutes, passing by a mix of shanty shops and hole in the wall pho or street food stalls, alongside sky-scraping glass office buildings, already illustrating the diversity of the city in many realms.

 

The fence outside of the War Remnants Museum sports signs with peace slogans and cheerful emblems – once inside the compound, American military planes, helicopters and tanks already contribute to the discomfort of the place. An adult entrance ticket costs 15,000 VND. Immediately at the entrance is an example structure of the prisons and torture areas utilized during the war; models and explanations of the ranging and many torture techniques employed against prisoners, including “Tiger Cages” and many revolting practices are illustrated through models and information boards explaining. This section as well as the entire museum includes photography, some certainly more graphic than others, so good to come prepared. As would be imagined, the museum itself, through three floors of exhibits, offers quite a solemn and difficult experience. Comparable (experience-wise) to a visit to the concentration camps of Europe or the museums and memorials commemorating the tragedies and atrocities of WWII, the War Remnants Museum offers a sobering glance into the history behind the American war of aggression as perpetrated in Vietnam in the 1960s-70s, the lasting impacts, many of which have transcended time, and the worldwide sentiment of solidarity with Vietnam which emerged during that time. As mentioned, some exhibits are more graphic than others – particularly those illustrating photographs with descriptions taken in and around the battlefield, the aftermath of American time bombs, which both during and (many years) after the war, caused many deaths. The exhibit focused on the impact of Agent Orange (and more specifically, the toxic dioxin chemical), is especially grim, showing detailed photos of the effect on many people during and after the war, including four generations of children born showing a multitude of physical and genetic defects caused by the exposure of their parents and ancestors to the horrific substance. An elderly Vietnamese woman, giving a tour in Spanish, explained – “the effects of the dioxin chemical were horrific and long lasting. Eventually, the American veterans that were affected with symptoms demanded from the U.S. government for retribution, and they were helped. The U.S. never helped the Vietnamese people that had been affected and were still suffering.” The museum is noticeably propagandist, but nevertheless an important, necessary and interesting experience to have while visiting Vietnam and HCMC.

 

After spending about 3 hours scouring the exhibits of the War Remnants Museum, I decided for a change of scenery. I was headed for Ben Thanh Market when after walking for about 15 minutes, I felt the first few heavy drops of rain… not wanting to stand for who knows how long exactly under a random overhang, I decided to keep going and try to at least find a spot to eat; I had read about a Pho restaurant right across from the market and knew I was getting close. In the time it took me to walk only 100 yards, the droplets had turned to downpour, people scattering in all directions to find shelter. Hurrying the last few steps and slipping in my flip flops, I ducked into the “Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf” café, above which was the restaurant I was looking for, Pho 2000. I was pleased to find that I was one of, if not the only non-local in the nondescript spot. I ordered vegetable Pho (Pho Chay) and a Vietnamese iced coffee. Alongside the Pho was served plates of fresh bean sprouts and fresh herbs to mix into the broth, and delicious rich coffee, poured over ice and sweet condensed milk (a Vietnamese specialty – get involved if you aren’t already). Who’s to know how strange they thought I was, sitting alone at my little table, dripping ever so slightly.

 

After a delicious lunch of Pho, I ventured back out to find that the rain had all but ceased, so I crossed the street between motorbikes and into the Ben Thanh Market. Ben Thanh is one of the largest and most famous markets in HCMC, which translates into most touristy, but it is still an amazing place to see, experience, and get some souvenir shopping done. Selling everything from clothing and bags to magnets, candles and all crazy trinkets in between, Ben Thanh market is home to a constant noisy hum, absolutely buzzing with activity. Vendors shouting out to me from all sides, I wound my way deeper into the market, pushing past bundles of clothing and tables full of collectables. After haggling the price at least in half (and a piece of me thinks I should have done even better), I bought a few things and headed on my way. To give you an idea of price, I was told that a cloth backpack with embroidered flowers (similar to bags in Thailand and SEA) was 800,000 VND – I ended up paying 380,000 for the bag and several smaller trinkets. I was later told that a single scarf costs 1,000,000 – I ended up with 2 for less than 400,000, but the ones that weren’t “100% silk”. The argument for higher prices is always something along the lines of the goods being handmade up in the mountains, or real pure silk, or some other variation; I completely agree with this and also that the goods are amazing works of art, though I also know that no matter what I end up paying, it is still a very decent deal for the vendors and so in the interest of saving money, I bargain to the bitter end most of the time anyway – it is expected and anticipated for in the high first prices that are given, which are always up to double for tourists anyway.

 

After visiting the market, I made my way back to my hotel (the whole day I explored by foot, as I felt this would allow me to slow down and take in all the sights and surroundings as much as possible to experience the city better). Nearby my hotel a lady stood outside handing out business cards for the upstairs massage business, and after taking a few steps past, I thought “why not” – and circled back to inquire about a foot massage. I ended up getting a lovely foot massage, though more expensive than I am used to in KL (only by a few USD of course), and adherent to a much more pressured tipping policy. Of course, tipping varies in every country and then further in each massage house, but in this case the lady that I was with followed my foot massage with “so you tip me” – not exactly a question. I had said of course and pulled out the VND I had left, which clearly did not please her. She became a bit flustered, exclaiming how small the Vietnamese money is and that this is nothing, she then said I would pay and tip by credit card. At this point, I didn’t have a choice and followed her down to a hotel lobby (they must collaborate) as she carried my credit card and told the lady at the desk what amount to charge (300 for massage, 100 for tip) – something that just wouldn’t happen in Malaysia, or hasn’t yet to me, but it was a one time thing, so fine. Nevertheless, it was lovely and I returned home lazy and comfy after a long day of wandering, exploring, and was embarrassingly ready to turn in for the evening.

 

I had heard and read a bit about the backpacker street (supposed Khaosan Road of HCMC), which is the go-to night spot for travelers and locals to have a beer and chill or get wild. Despite my desire to explore and experience the full spectrum of life in the city, after getting back to my room to drop off my stuff, I was feeling so tired from the early morning of travelling and not much sleep the night prior that I couldn’t bring myself to leave again. So, I proceeded to convince myself that I wouldn’t be missing TOO much, and that surely it is similar to all of the other “backpacker streets” in Asia (let me know if I was horribly mistaken and should go back?!) and swallowed my FOMO, to happily curl up in bed.

 

Day Two

 

My Sunday in HCMC started well-rested, and with a lovely continental breakfast at the Liberty Central Saigon Riverside hotel. After eating a leisurely breakfast, I geared up for more exploring (read: highly touristy sightseeing) and headed out. On my way to the sights, my attention was caught by THE MOST AMAZING boutique shop – Thuy Design House. Just from the windows outside, this place looks crazy. Once inside, I was greeted by colors, sequins, crazy patterns galore; just my kind of place! This shop seems to combine traditional Vietnamese styles, patterns and fabric with the insanely eclectic creativity of the designers, who have created some truly amazing pieces! Certainly quite unlike anything I had ever seen before. After dabbling in the store for a while, I continued on my original quest. Here are the places I visited:

 

Saigon Notre Dame Basilica and Central Post Office

 

The cathedral, a mini Notre Dame in light reddish brick, sits perched in a well-manicured garden in the center of a roundabout-like square, backdrop to a variety of tourist photos and wedding shoots. I did not go inside actually, as there seemed to be a service going on for Sunday, and the gates were closed. I have also been advised that because this cathedral is so popular, it becomes extremely busy inside to the point of almost not worth seeing around. Regardless, it is indeed a beautiful building from the outside and very photographic, so recommended to at least see. The Saigon Central Post office is a vivid yellow building from the exterior, almost directly across from the Notre Dame cathedral. Designed and built by Gustave Eiffel in gothic style, it began operations in 1886 and still remains one of the most famous and celebrated structures in the city – and is still in full use as a proper post office! The interior of the post office, with stark contrasts across a long, domed roof, is drippingly instagrammable and striking in and of itself – definitely worth a glance inside.

 

Tan Dinh Market

 

Having already explored Ben Thanh the previous day, I wanted to see a different type of market, and Tan Dinh was just that; this is a place for locals, truly. I didn’t honestly encounter a single tourist nearby or inside the market, which sells a staggering variety of goods, on a massive scale. The market is most famous for its cloths and fabrics, of silk and any and every variety, color, print, and style that you could imagine. If you seek traditional Vietnamese fabric or any variation thereof, and especially if you plan on designing some of your own clothing, this is your place. One downside is that the fabrics are mostly sold in quite large quantities, which are perfect to buy for the purpose of clothing design etc., but just so happen to be a bit inconvenient for the luggage-bound traveler. Still, an amazing place to have a look around, and the vendors are far less pushy and rather uninterested in visitors, so you can wander through quite peacefully. The glances that I got wandering through were some of the most amusing- some quizzical, some simply bewildered, and some of the warmest smiles I’ve seen. Being in this market, and wandering even to the very back, among the bags of rice and spices and household goods and foods finally felt like a piece of true Ho Chi Minh, if not of Vietnam.

 

Tan Dinh Parish Church

Where Barbie goes to church. No really, I’m serious. Have a look for yourself. This church was built in the 1880s, during the French colonial period. The church is the second largest in the city (after Notre Dame) and is drenched in the most obnoxiously precious shade of bubblegum pink. Instagrammers, at the ready (ew). What a beautiful church though, pink or no pink – although the color certainly helps its random appeal (you’ll see what I mean when you see the street at which it is situated) – with impressive roman architecture creating a splendid grandeur, smack in the middle of an otherwise rather rough and tumble Asian street. A peaceful garden outside of the church hosts statues of Jesus and apostles, and offers a peaceful, quiet and shaded place for those wanting to pray, reflect or just sit and take it all in. Looking through the windows, I could see the inside of the church is completely whitewashed (it was closed for entry that day, and the gates to view the outer part were closed until 2PM, probably due to services).

 

Seeing these main sights took me a fair distance through the city, and after I had visited them all it was nearing my time to head back. As I would, I got caught in a total downpour while walking back, ducked into a high end mall alongside many other soggy walkers, and eventually ended up hopping in a taxi for the short ride back to my hotel, as the rain didn’t seem to intend on slowing down anytime soon. The rest of my time before airport was spent in the hotel lobby, happily curled up with a cup of coffee and reading.

 

My time in Vietnam (the very first for me!) was short but filled with interesting experiences, thoughts and observations. I would like to go back for a longer visit, to get an even better feel of the society, culture, and history.

EATING MELBOURNE: A guide to some of Melbourne’s best eats

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Mar 23, 2017

 

I’ve recently been told (albeit by local Melburnians) that Melbourne has not only the best coffee worldwide, but has food that is unrivaled in Australia and elsewhere. For me, Melbourne seems to evoke a sort of Portland, even San Fran at times city vibe, but when it comes to the food space, we are definitely talking Chi town Michelin star level, San Fran’s Marina district, Manhattan’s foodie hotspots… this place knows how to eat. With only a few weeks under my best roaming Melbourne’s art-drenched alleyways, let’s be honest… I’ve been mostly concerned with where my next meal is coming from, and tried to eat my way around some new corners of the city. Here I share with you a few of my favorites from my recent wanderings.

 

Queen Victoria Night Market

While during the day, the Queen Victoria Market is a permanent installation, selling a range of things from tools to fresh produce, the night market only emerges in full force on Wednesday evenings throughout the summer. My visits to Melbourne have fortunately been during February and March, right in the middle of a lovely, warm summer. The night market is absolutely one of my favorite things to do during the week, and a wonderful way to experience some of Melbourne’s true local color and culture. The market is huge and offers an insane variety of food (and trinkets, for after-dinner browsing), so bring a BIG appetite. You will find cuisines at the market ranging from thai street food to greek, to BBQ. Just get involved in everything.

*All time faves: you must try the Running Bull Sangria (it’s a market favorite), and the mixed meat platter from the BBQ place (I forget the name, but you’ll know what I mean; it’s a booth that sells nothing but BBQ meats, including ribs, pulled pork, and sausage). If you only eat one thing at the market, you must must must get Taki’s Balls. As their slogan states, “we don’t break em, we make em!” Taki’s hot, delicious balls are covered either in sugar or Nutella, and trust me, you want them in your mouth right now.

 

Moroccan Soup Bar

This is an absolute MUST visit while in Melbourne. Nestled along St. Georges St, in an inconspicuous corner of Fitzroy, the restaurant peeks out from behind an unassuming façade, with a few tables and chairs bordering the sidewalk outside. MSB opens most days of the week at 6:00PM sharp, and trust me, you want to arrive at 6, or a few minutes earlier. I made the mistake of taking a stroll down St. Georges as I had arrived too early for opening to a still and quiet restaurant, completely closed… but when I returned around 6:02PM, the entire restaurant was already packed. By the time I had finished dinner and left, there was a waiting que actually bunched up in hipster clusters down the sidewalk. After 6pm, a small section of St. Georges in Fitzroy teems with life, happiness and laughter as friends and families come together to share in the joy of good food and vibes to be had at MSB. If you expect that you will need some time with the menu because it is simply too difficult to decide; everything looks so delicious… you’re wrong. You’re in for a surprise, or several. One of the restaurant’s defining characteristics is its renowned verbal menu; yes, spoken. You either choose the big buffet, or the bigger buffet, and they bring you the food after accommodating for any food allergies you may have. As you’ll notice from the signs, décor and overall ambiance, the restaurant is a fierce defender of all things just, right and fair and brings these messages to each and every visitor. If you have an open mind and are hankering after some of the most delicious Moroccan food (probably outside of Morocco and in the world), make time for MSB, and bring a big appetite!

 

Chocolate Buddha

YUM. Located smack in the middle of Fed Square in Melbourne’s bustling CBD, Chocolate Buddha boasts a view of the open section of fed square, including the outdoor TV screen, amazing architecture in all directions, and is less than a 5 minute walk from the riverbank. Chocolate Buddha offers a delicious Asian fusion menu, and I would simply recommend ordering as much as you think you can eat; everything is delicious so try some of your comfort favorites and something new on this fun menu… In retrospect, perhaps the restaurant gets its name from the chocolate spring rolls which are simply a must-try (is that even a question).

 

Five Points Specialty Coffee and Bagels

This cozy little café is centrally located and is a convenient and perfect spot for coffee and bagel lovers (ME!) to grab a bite for breakkie or a midday coffee to and from whatever the day in Melbourne CBD may have in store. A wide array of bagel options, from healthy and fresh to bacon and egg style, all the way through to Nutella, peanut butter, banana… you get the idea. The coffee, as most is in good ol’ Melb, is of course delicious.

 

Riverland Urban Beer Garden

“Urban beer garden” is an excellent way to describe Riverland, as it captures the essence and vibe of a picturesque waterside café, along with the funky menu and comfort food offerings (think delicious BBQ, pulled pork sandwiches and plenty of fries) of one of your classic favorites. It is a fabulous go-to for a nice meal with a view, a good place to relax from the hustle and bustle during a long day of exploring, or a lovely place to simply sit and catch up with a friend or loved one as you watch the boats float by.

 

The Fair Trader Café & Bar

This funky eatery in downtown Melbourne is for the lovers of all things healthy, fresh, and organic. This is not to say Fair Trader is some vegan-exclusive, hippie dippie establishment with lamas out front to greet you; businessmen and fitness freaks sit side by side in this bustling café/restaurant, and it is a great place to meet friends, have a friendly and chatty lunch, or get some work done, if you don’t need absolute quiet. The menu offers quintessentially delicious Aussie (Melbourne) fair, featuring the classics like smashed avo, salads, sandwiches, with a menu variety that should suit just about anyone.

 

RMB Café

Disclaimer: Degraves Street should simply have its own category as “best places to eat in Melbourne” – straight up. All of the cafés and eateries along this fabulously cozy laneway off of Flinders Ln downtown Melbourne are amazing, delicious… need I go on. If you are looking for a place to eat, drink, (shop), chill… whatever – my go-to is the Flinders Lane area, and Degraves St. must have every possibility for yummy food options. RMB sits at the entry to Degraves, so has an open view down the lane and the tables outside provide an optimal perch for people watching. The menu is classic, with a wide variety for both breakfast and lunch options, ranging from a delicious take on smashed avocado toast, featuring a little spice and smoked salmon, to salads and sandwiches.

 

Mockturtle

How could you not love Mockturtle. Not just another hole in the wall on Degraves St., Mockturtle is funky, unique, and just plain cute. From its tiny two-person booths inside the café, to its menu scrawled in chalk along the boards outside, to its delicious coffee, Mockturtle is a solid go-to for coffee and food along Degraves. Brunch here is fantastic, with both traditional fare, as well as fun and sugary-sweet items that you should probably just go ahead and try… because there’s always tomorrow to start your “diet.”

 

Little Cupcakes

Indeed, another classic of Degraves Street, but it is one to even give Doughnut Time a run for its money! (You should still go get a doughnut, anyway). Delicious coffee, quaint vibes… baby cupcakes. What more could you possibly want on an afternoon stroll through downtown Melbourne. Hit up Little Cupcakes before your next weekend tea party, girls night in, or perhaps even your snuggly picnic in the park!

 

#

(Yes, Hash). Officially “Hash Specialty Coffee & Roaster,” # is a vibrant and quirky café and restaurant on Hardware St. The menu offers a classic range of delicious meals and snacks, with a beautiful and funky twist. For example, # porridge is adorned with a lovely array of flowers, nuts, and seeds so that it really looks like the porridge fairies would eat. You MUST try the fairy floss hot chocolate; as it sounds, a tall plume of sugary fairy floss (cotton candy, for us Americans) is served in a mug, looking a bit like one of those 90s troll-dolls fell in too far. Alongside in a chemistry beaker comes hot, silky rich chocolate liquid. Now, get your cameras at the ready and go ahead! Watch the fairy floss melt away as you pour the chocolate over, and try not to get too distracted as to miss the mug!

 

Oli & Levi Café

This is one of those places that truly embodies the Melburnian culture (or one of the cultures, anyway) of taking coffee really, really, seriously – but delivering it with an air of effortless sophistication in a rough and tumble atmosphere. To outsiders, the café appears to be a hipster hotspot, but it’s so much more than that. This place has transcended hipster, or was hipster before hipster existed, however you may explain it. There is one wooden table inside where you are welcomed to sit and enjoy your small breakfast snacks and expertly-crafted coffee over the  but it may be reasonable to not expect a seat at any given time, simply because the place is so small.

 

Naked for Satan

This. is. a Melbourne CLASSIC. Dark rooms with antiquated wooden furniture drenched in red velvet, curated heurs d’oeuvres on toothpicks, and yes I’m getting there… a certain level of nudity. I’m not going to tell you where, or how. Just go and see for yourself. Don’t worry, it’s nothing too crazy; in fact, NFS is arguably the coolest hangout spot (shoutout to the epic rooftop with a complete view of the Melbourne skyline) in the city! It is a favorite of locals and visitors alike, and you must spend at least one (hopefully sunny!) avo sipping a craft local beer or one of the Naked for Satan specially-flavored vodka infused teas up on the roof.

 

Bimbo Deluxe

Bimbo is at least a must-see, if not a must-visit, during your time in Melbourne and is an obvious destination if you find yourself in Brunswick. Just up the street for our fave Naked for Satan, Bimbo is its very own brand of weird- you’ll quickly see why. From the giant plastic baby doll suspended from the façade of the building high above the heads of wondering passerby, to the famous $4 PIZZA after 7pm, and all day on Sundays. Shit gets a little weird (what am I saying, it was already weird to begin with) in Bimbo… in a good way.

 

Go-to foodie areas for when you’re in town:

Queen Victoria (Night) Market

Degraves St, off Flinders Ln

Hardware Lane (and Street)

Brunswick (walk the length of Brunswick St.)

 

 

Go on people, the coffee isn’t going to drink itself!!

New Zealand’s most amazing natural wonders – down the rabbit hole at Waiotapu Thermal Wonderland

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Mar 6, 2017

Have YOU ever fallen down the rabbit hole? How about one that ends in boiling pools of neon yellow goop? If this sounds up your alley, head on out to Rotorua, New Zealand. Let’s talk about Waiotapu – what does it mean? Waiotapu is a maori word meaning “sacred waters,” and is an active geothermal area at the southern area of the Okataina Volcanic Center in New Zealand’s Taupo Volcanic Zone. Thermal – indeed, quite self-explanatory. Wonderland – aptly titled, because between the unsettling and unnatural (but 1000% natural!) colors, the 100 degree+ temperatures (Celsius) and the crazy landscapes, this beauty will have you feeling like Alice for sure… perhaps after the “eat me, drink me” encounter.

 

There is no shortage of beautiful wonders to see at Waiotapu, so I would allow at least 2 hours for your visit, if not a bit more. If you’re up for an early start, the Lady Knox Geyser (allegedly) awakens every morning at 10:15AM (unfortunately I visited in the afternoon, so cannot confirm this lovely experience but am hoping to see it next time!) The park is well-landscaped with clearly defined paths for visitors, and plenty of signs indicating where really not to step or leave the indicated path given the high temperatures of the ground and steam coming out of the thermal caves. Visitors are able to choose which path (of three main options) they wish to follow, namely a shorter track (walk 1) that takes you to the main attractions of the Central Pools and Champagne Pool, a middle ground (walk 1 & 2) offering some additional sights, and then the full extended trek (walk 1, 2, & 3), which, while not at all more difficult or arduous, provides so many surprises along the way and an unforgettable end view. Estimated lengths and times of walk 1 is 1.5km, 30 min; walk 2 is 2km and should take 40 min, while walk 3 is 3km and should take about 75 min. I was unsure which path to take at first because the guides in the welcome center sound rather ambivalent but say of course it’s all very interesting, may as well go all the way for some additional nice photos… but if you take away anything from this writing, do the full circuit walk!!! It. Is. Amazing. And so SO worth it. My last minute decision to do the entire path because (why not, I was already there) turned out to be an excellent choice, and once you complete the first half with main attractions, a significant chunk of tourists with their impending selfie sticks have already circled back for the entrance, leaving you alone to wander amongst the nature alone with your thoughts, camera (ok, perhaps a selfie stick of your own), and some really breathtaking views.

 

What you’ll see

Along any walk you choose, you will pass a huge variety of wonders, including thermal caves spewing steam, bubbling ominously from their depths, and a lovely sulfuric smell… yum. All of these caves and pools you will see throughout the course of the day are results of time, and location in one of the most active volcanic areas in the world. Here are some of the park’s highlights, and my favorites:

 

Artist’s Palette: After earthquakes caused the Champagne Pool to tilt, mineral laden water flowed over the flat, causing this multicolored display of chemical beauty. Orange, bright yellows and surreal greens and blues paint across the water as mineral deposits are spread around by the wind.

 

Champagne Pool: arguably the most famous attribute of Waiotapu, the Champagne Pool occupies a crater that was formed during an eruption 700 years ago! Purportedly the most violent eruption that the world has seen in the past 5,000 years, ash was seen as far away as the skies of Europe and China. What’s going on to make it these crazy colors, you may ask… let alone the “champagne”-esque bubbles? Well, let’s just say there’s some knarly chemistry going on, to say the least.

            For my science buffs: the water enters the pool at a temp of 230 degrees Celsius and cools within the pool to around 74 degrees, with a pH of 5.4, making it slightly acidic. The gas bubbles rising to the surface are C02, the orange colored edge containing arsenic and antimony sulfur compounds rich in minerals including gold and silver.

 

Lake Ngakoro: This is the enormous, stunning lake that greets deserving visitors at the end of their trek (on the long walk). Crisply turquoise, the lake lures one into its beautiful depths. Take your time just looking, soaking in the beauty, and enjoy life for a moment.

 

Devil’s Bathtub: The most intriguing (perhaps most disturbing) feature of Waiotapu may in fact be its most tranquil (in terms of chemistry and volcanic activity, anyway). Also sitting in a crater caused by eruption likely centuries ago, the stagnant liquid of Devil’s Bathtub is an astonishingly (anyone have a better word?!) neon yellow/green, resulting from sulfur deposits that rise to its surface. LOVELOVELOVE. Stay wild, Waiotapu- seriously.

 

Mud Pool

Ok, you’ve seen all the craziness that nature has to offer. You’ve seen 100 degree steam rising from a bright green pool, a small lake properly comparable only to Gatorade, and wonder upon wonder of geothermal amazement. Stop right there. You simply cannot drive away from Waiotapu without first driving just beyond their main parking area… back towards the signs pointing out “Mud Pools.” A visit to Waiotapu simply would not be complete without seeing Rotorua’s famous boiling mud. It’s just as magical as it sounds, I promise. Go ahead, I dare you to jump in (just kidding, please don’t. As one of the kind fellows that welcomed us implored, “if you want to keep your legs, please refrain.”) The mud occupies the site of a once-volcano which eroded in the 1920s, leaving a rather mysterious and captivating pit of bubbling and boiling goo (which, by the way, is the source of many luxurious cosmetic products including a killer face mask!). Laugh, point, take some pics… try to predict when the next big bubble will come- that’s all, folks.

 

Whether you’re traveling NZ solo or bringing the whole fam damily, this place is MAGICAL, and you need to go. Now. Go see these whimsical wonders and feel your jaw drop- dayum, Mother Nature.

 

 

*Getting there: Waiotapu is more or less smack in the middle of New Zealand’s north island, and nearly equidistant from Taupo and Rotorua. I visited Waiotapu en route from Wellington to Auckland via a night over in Taupo- a quick drive down “Thermal Explorers’ highway” is accessible and easy the next morning. From my experience, having a car to see around NZ is simply preferable, because you avoid uncertainty, get to see all of these tucked-away places, and of course, can see what you want, when and how and you travel on your own terms. J

Happy New Year! Looking Back on 2016

by , on
Dec 31, 2016

While many people (I must say me included) are happy to bid adieu to 2016, I must count my lucky stars, for it has been an amazing year to me in many ways. I have so much to be thankful for, not the least of which is travel.

 

At the time of this writing (Dec 2016) I have visited a total of 21 countries – (not many, compared to some of my travelbug peers, I know!) – and hope to make this number grow significantly in the coming months and years!! 11 of those countries have been newly added to my list, just within the year 2016! I am hoping to (at least) match that number, (or double, or more!) in 2017. My most favorite new spots of the year were Indonesia and London <3

 

My travels this year have taken me mostly around Asia, Europe, and the U.S., and I continue to encounter amazing new experiences, places, cultures and people everywhere I go. I am so excited to finally start my travel blog so that I can share some of these experiences with an amazing community of passionate and inspiring people who love travel and adventure just as much as I do.

 

Travel has been a powerful force in my life and recently, shaped who I am and shown me who I want to be. It has taught me a love so deep and pure- for our earth, for all of its beautiful nomads, and for life. Reflecting back on the past year, I would not trade my experiences for the world. I am full of hope for the new year, and for all of the amazing opportunities it will bring. I wish each and every one of you all that Is happy and wonderful in 2017 – may you be strong, kind, wise, happy, productive, and may all your dreams come true (I think they will!) In the meantime, enjoy what is to come on the new blog, and keep traveling! I would love to hear about some of your own adventures in 2016 – keep in touch or comment about your own favorite experiences 🙂

 

Happy Happy New Year!!!! And, as always…

STAY WILD
XXX