WILDTHG TRAVEL

The World’s Best Roadtrips – Australia’s Great Ocean Road

by , on
Jun 10, 2017

You must do this

If you happen to ask any Aussie, particularly a Melburnian, about what things are good to do or see during your time in Oz, you’ll hear about the Great Ocean Road. Firsts things first: the GOR is in no way overrated and is perhaps even a little underrated… the views, the activities… just the experience of seeing and traveling along this magnificent stretch of Australian coastline – is unforgettable and simply unlike anything else you’ll ever see! Driving the GOR was undoubtedly one of the best road trips I’ve ever made, and one I would do again in a heartbeat.

 

So, you’re on a tight schedule

It’s ok. So was I. In fact, I only had the weekend! I’m sharing my 2 day GOR itinerary with you and what I was able to see and do, so you will at least be able to get a feel for how long everything takes and hopefully, be able to better plan your own Great Ocean adventure! I have met people that have driven down (usually this means as far as the 12 apostles or partway there), and back in one day, although I do feel that this would make for quite a rushed trip. I would recommend making at least a 2 day trip out of it, and this is certainly doable, though I also think the more time you have along this fantastic route, the better.

 

But… they’re on the wrong side of the road??

Don’t worry, we all go through this at least once. Believe it or not, I drove the entire weekend for the first time being on what is for me the wrong side of the road – and the wrong side of the car! Fortunately, with a little extra care, everything was absolutely fine, though the driving was of course an adventure in and of itself. In the interest of safety, it is of course best to only drive the route if you feel completely comfortable with driving generally, regardless of the side, as it can get quite curvy and narrow in parts. The road is completely modern and very well maintained in all areas, and quite nice to drive, with plenty of pull outs for “slow” cars, aka to let the locals pass, and well-marked corners and speed zones – keep an eye out for the well-known kangaroos ahead signs!

 

*A note on the drive: There are tons of pullout spots, so don’t worry about getting in someone’s way, and better, there are even more pullout spots at amazingly scenic spots for quick photos or leg-stretches, and the reason my trip actually took a bit longer than the prescribed times or distances you will see on Google Maps is because during the first day of our trip, I stopped at almost, if not every single one of these pullout spots, addicted to the amazing views of the powerful ocean, majestic coastline, and amazing peacefulness of the road itself. You’ll have plenty of opportunities for these, so if you miss one, don’t worry – there will be a next soon!

 

My two-day GOR itinerary 

 

Day 1:

 

Melbourne to Torqay (approx 1.5 hours) – Though it is debated where exactly the Great Ocean Road “begins,” Geelong is typically referenced as the real starting point. Given the time constraint, we decided to skip Geelong and head straight for Torqay, a seaside town most well known as the home to the National Surfing Museum, and Bells Beach. We went out to Bells Beach to a very windswept, though breathtaking, view, just long enough to watch a view hardy surfers braving the winds and cold waters, before we continued on.

 

Torqay to Lorne (45 min) – Even smaller than Torqay, Lorne is a quaint seaside town along the route, but a convenient and favorite place to stop, as well as home to a must-see; Teddy’s Lookout (about 5 min beyond Lorne center, searchable on Google Maps). Just a short drive to the top end of George Street (it may seem like you’re driving to nowhere) takes you to an amazing and majestic lookout with views of bass straight and the Great Ocean Road, winding around the cliffs. Just after visiting Teddy’s Lookout, I came across a sign for “Sheoak Falls”; as waterfall-obsessed as I am, I pulled into the designated parking lot and hiked for about 30-40 minutes down a small path, up a gulley and into the forested area until I reached a small trickling waterfall. Another 15 minutes or so beyond this and another waterfall section, visible between golden rays of sunlight and draping trees. Nothing out of NatGeo, but a beautiful and relatively easy hike. If you have the time, I would recommend doing ALL the waterfalls of GOR, but sadly I was quite short for time, so I chose my battles, but just had to follow this little path. We turned back after a while, still trying to make the 12 apostles by sunset.

 

Lorne to Apollo Bay (1 hour) – There are several key lookouts, vistas and attractions nearby to Apollo Bay, just on the eastern side of Cape Otway (lighthouse). A nice place to take a break, pull over and take some pictures along the way. We stopped for a quick lunch of grilled fish in the small town, before continuing on down the road.

 

Apollo Bay to Lavers Hill (1 hour) – this is a good route to type into Google Maps if you need to shave a bit of time off your trip or are hurrying down to the apostles as we were; this route goes inland and cuts off the Great Otway National Park portion of the GOR. To make sure you’re on the right track in case of signal loss, follow signs towards “Lavers Hill”.

 

Lavers Hill to Princetown (40 mins) – this last stretch of the drive (also up North of the Otways getting to Lavers Hill is incredibly magical, as the inland portion away from the coast takes you through an incredible jungley, rainforest-like overhang of dense, luscious greenery and tall, tall trees of all kinds, Eucalyptus included! (You are supposed to be able to spot koalas at a few key places along the GOR, though unfortunately this was one sight I missed). We were still on the approach to Princetown as the sun was rapidly descending, and wanting to make it in time to see the 12 apostles at sunset, we hurried to the parking lot (well marked) for the attraction, parking and heading out to the main viewing area. We were right in time, and caught the magnificent formations in the moody hues of a cloudy sunset. Of course, some nights are 1000% better than others, so unless you are a professional photographer waiting to get the photo for the yearly GOR calendar, you may be counting on a hit or a miss here. Of course, any sunset at the 12 apostles is going to be unforgettable and magical, so I would still recommend it. Alternatively, you could opt for sunrise, which arguably does light up the apostles themselves much better, as the sun is then shining from the proper direction.

 

Overnight: as I decided upon and booked the trip rather last minute, there was not an overwhelming abundance of accommodation options around the area. I figured in the end that if anything, the trade off between comfort/amenities and access to the apostles may be a worthy compromise, so I found the “hotel” as close as possible to the apostles; it turned out to be down a driveway actually connected to the viewing area parking lot! The Twelve Apostles Motel & Country Retreat is an intriguing experience, to say the least, and was one of the many pieces that made for an absolutely unforgettable (and at times, laughable) weekend. Driving down Booringa road seems like you’re just trying to find an abandoned barn and then get lost even more, but have faith and functional car headlights, and you’ll find it eventually. The small yard we pulled into seemed only slightly out of a horror film, with only slightly creepy dwarves and figurines jutting crookedly out of the grass amongst the sparse trees, a sign on the “office” door telling new visitors to pick up the phone receiver for service after hours. This is one of the those places I suppose you would joke about never wanting to show up after dark, and then of course when do you think you show up…? Eventually, a slightly odd but friendly woman bustled out to greet us and hand us our room key, with directions to one of the rooms behind the tree line. We drove out further, parked the car and made our way into our little abode for the evening. If retreating into the countryside – way, way into it – is the kind of vibe you’re going for, this is the place for you. Each little bungalow thingy forms a glorified trailer park, with worn out amenities but still, I couldn’t complain at a shower (actually with hot water), a warm blanket, and a functioning heater (it gets cold out here at night!) We made our camp for the night, snuggling into the strange little house and laughing at the circumstance, simply happy to be in the experience. Luckily, we had brought plenty of leftovers from our dinner the night previous in Melbourne, because the best that this motel can offer at the time was a sadly worn cup of microwave noodles (I think), and the area itself is not exactly popping. Note to self, bring food in and don’t rely on having much more than a microwave, and/or make dinner or accommodation plans in a bigger town on ahead, like Port Campbell.

 

Day 2:

 

After a morning visit back to the apostles to see them in stronger daylight, we continued our journey, knowing that this time it would take us back to Melbourne. Wanting to see a bit more of the coast and a few key attractions, we headed first down the road towards Port Campell, stopping a short 10-15 minutes away to see the Loch Ard Gorge. The gorge is named after the clipper ship “Loch Ard,” which ran aground on a nearby island in 1878, nearly at the end of a 3-month long journey from England to Melbourne. Supposedly this particular passage was so dangerous that it claimed many ships during those years. There were only two survivors from the Loch Ard; a 19 year old ship’s apprentice and a 19 year old Irish woman, emigrating with her family, who was stuck in the waters and rescued by the ship’s apprentice, who then climbed out of the gorge to call for help. Being inside the gorge is both eery and impressive, with massive waves crashing thorugh the narrow entrance and swelling into the gorge. I couldn’t imagine having to climb out, so I was definitely glad there is a well-built staircase to enter and leave the gorge. Since my visit, I have seen a few photos of people swimming and sunbathing down in the gorge; it looks simply magical when the sun shines down and lights up the clear blue waters – if you’ve been to my insta page, you can see that it is a bit more dismal when cloudy, but still impressive. Driving the GOR in middle of hot, sunny summer is definitely on my bucket list, with plenty of time to pull over and swim, sunbathe and explore.

 

We next drove along the coast south of Port Campbell and stopped to have a quick breakkie (of smashed avo toast with feta and rocket, of course), at a little café overlooking an inlet. A few brave visitors were gearing up for a morning swim, which I felt was far too brave for my style of only swimming if the water, or weather, or both – are quite warm. After breakfast we drove on a bit further down the coast to see London Bridge, a popular scenic view over another “apostle-like” rock formation out in the ocean which used to be connected to the other rocks by a small bridge-like formation. Aka “London Arch,” the formation used to form a complete double span bridge, until in 1990 a sudden unexpected collapse of the span connecting the rock to land left two surprised tourists out on the water-bound section, to be rescued by helicopter. During our visit, it was just a tourst hot spot, with loud groups of Chinese tours vying for the best photo op. Needless to say, it was lovely, but we didn’t hang around too long after taking a few photos and admiring the view, as once again we wanted to conserve time when possible.

 

Back to Melbourne: We continued back the other way, counting the “kangaroo ahead” signs that we passed and once again, admiring the amazing variation of landscapes along the impressive coastal stretch. Knowing that we wouldn’t have time to do everything we wanted along the route, we decided to see two main attractions on the way back to Melbourne while we still had the daylight:

 

Otway Fly Treetop Adventures: Just north of Cape Otway National Park along Colac Lavers Hill Rd, Otway Fly is a park offering hiking along a metal, 25- meter high treetop walk that stretches for 600 meters throughout the dense canopy of the leafy green trees. It only takes about an hour to complete at a comfortable pace and is easily accessible for all ability and fitness levels; some people even brought their strollers along. Otway Fly also offers an “Eco Zip Line Tour,” which takes about 2.5 hours, during which you zip from tree to tree for a more exhilarating experience of the diverse unique flora and fauna in the Otways! Sadly, our time was too tight for the zip line, but maybe someday. Random tip, look out for the trees along the road on the way into the park that totally look like broccoli.

 

Triplet Falls: Very near to Otway Fly Treetop park, Triplet Falls is recognized (according to my research, anyway) as one of the most beautiful and popular falls to visit along the GOR. Of course, I would love more than anything to spend time hiking out to each and every one, though by looking into it a bit, I discovered that some of the very best are indeed a several hour-long hike in and out, so given the time availability and proximity, it made the most sense to visit Triplet for this trip. Follow Google Maps and signs down a shaded curvy road into beautiful dense forest, and eventually you will reach a small parking lot with the entrance to the falls. There are actually several ways to hike down of course, and separate paths leading to different falls and destinations. I hiked the loop, which entails turning slightly left from the parking lot and following signs to Triplet Falls; if you start out by going down a TON of stairs, this is the right track. Alternatively, you can go down by the way I came back up, which is behind the parking lot down to the right- this will take significantly less, even half the time of the other path and gets you directly down to the falls. If you have time and are willing to hit some stairs for the exercise (nothing too bad, I promise), I would recommend the loop anyway because you go through the most beautiful forest and honestly, you just feel like a little magical rainforest jungle fairy – ok, I did. You will start seeing small streamlets and offshoots of the falls before you actually reach them, so keep going – and once you get there, the only sad bit is that there is a viewing podium quite far from the falls themselves, and it would take a fair bit of time to figure out how to make it down any closer to the falls themselves. After spending some time observing the beautiful falls, we continued hiking, following a steeper set of stairs (but fewer), passing by even an old abandoned steam engine! Amazing to think that loggers used to frequent the area, and somehow pull out huge pieces of timber from the steep hillside.

 

A1 Princes Highway to Melbourne: After visiting the falls, the brightest part of the day was already speeding past us, and so we made the decision to head up inland a bit to shave some time off of our trip home, thinking that driving along the coast would lose most of its charm in the dark, anyway. We headed towards Colac as a maps destination in order to connect to the A1, or Princes Highway, which is basically a straight shot back into Melbourne. During our drive home, I made the lovely and rather hilarious discovery that wearing my glasses at night magically allow me to see properly (DUH), after struggling to read the fuzzy street signs at night (I’m a safe driver, I promise). After an adventure and beauty-packed weekend of driving, we pulled back into Melbourne to reminisce about all of the amazing sights we had experienced, and revel in the pure beauty that Australia relentlessly surprises us with.

EATING MELBOURNE: A guide to some of Melbourne’s best eats

by , on
Mar 23, 2017

 

I’ve recently been told (albeit by local Melburnians) that Melbourne has not only the best coffee worldwide, but has food that is unrivaled in Australia and elsewhere. For me, Melbourne seems to evoke a sort of Portland, even San Fran at times city vibe, but when it comes to the food space, we are definitely talking Chi town Michelin star level, San Fran’s Marina district, Manhattan’s foodie hotspots… this place knows how to eat. With only a few weeks under my best roaming Melbourne’s art-drenched alleyways, let’s be honest… I’ve been mostly concerned with where my next meal is coming from, and tried to eat my way around some new corners of the city. Here I share with you a few of my favorites from my recent wanderings.

 

Queen Victoria Night Market

While during the day, the Queen Victoria Market is a permanent installation, selling a range of things from tools to fresh produce, the night market only emerges in full force on Wednesday evenings throughout the summer. My visits to Melbourne have fortunately been during February and March, right in the middle of a lovely, warm summer. The night market is absolutely one of my favorite things to do during the week, and a wonderful way to experience some of Melbourne’s true local color and culture. The market is huge and offers an insane variety of food (and trinkets, for after-dinner browsing), so bring a BIG appetite. You will find cuisines at the market ranging from thai street food to greek, to BBQ. Just get involved in everything.

*All time faves: you must try the Running Bull Sangria (it’s a market favorite), and the mixed meat platter from the BBQ place (I forget the name, but you’ll know what I mean; it’s a booth that sells nothing but BBQ meats, including ribs, pulled pork, and sausage). If you only eat one thing at the market, you must must must get Taki’s Balls. As their slogan states, “we don’t break em, we make em!” Taki’s hot, delicious balls are covered either in sugar or Nutella, and trust me, you want them in your mouth right now.

 

Moroccan Soup Bar

This is an absolute MUST visit while in Melbourne. Nestled along St. Georges St, in an inconspicuous corner of Fitzroy, the restaurant peeks out from behind an unassuming façade, with a few tables and chairs bordering the sidewalk outside. MSB opens most days of the week at 6:00PM sharp, and trust me, you want to arrive at 6, or a few minutes earlier. I made the mistake of taking a stroll down St. Georges as I had arrived too early for opening to a still and quiet restaurant, completely closed… but when I returned around 6:02PM, the entire restaurant was already packed. By the time I had finished dinner and left, there was a waiting que actually bunched up in hipster clusters down the sidewalk. After 6pm, a small section of St. Georges in Fitzroy teems with life, happiness and laughter as friends and families come together to share in the joy of good food and vibes to be had at MSB. If you expect that you will need some time with the menu because it is simply too difficult to decide; everything looks so delicious… you’re wrong. You’re in for a surprise, or several. One of the restaurant’s defining characteristics is its renowned verbal menu; yes, spoken. You either choose the big buffet, or the bigger buffet, and they bring you the food after accommodating for any food allergies you may have. As you’ll notice from the signs, décor and overall ambiance, the restaurant is a fierce defender of all things just, right and fair and brings these messages to each and every visitor. If you have an open mind and are hankering after some of the most delicious Moroccan food (probably outside of Morocco and in the world), make time for MSB, and bring a big appetite!

 

Chocolate Buddha

YUM. Located smack in the middle of Fed Square in Melbourne’s bustling CBD, Chocolate Buddha boasts a view of the open section of fed square, including the outdoor TV screen, amazing architecture in all directions, and is less than a 5 minute walk from the riverbank. Chocolate Buddha offers a delicious Asian fusion menu, and I would simply recommend ordering as much as you think you can eat; everything is delicious so try some of your comfort favorites and something new on this fun menu… In retrospect, perhaps the restaurant gets its name from the chocolate spring rolls which are simply a must-try (is that even a question).

 

Five Points Specialty Coffee and Bagels

This cozy little café is centrally located and is a convenient and perfect spot for coffee and bagel lovers (ME!) to grab a bite for breakkie or a midday coffee to and from whatever the day in Melbourne CBD may have in store. A wide array of bagel options, from healthy and fresh to bacon and egg style, all the way through to Nutella, peanut butter, banana… you get the idea. The coffee, as most is in good ol’ Melb, is of course delicious.

 

Riverland Urban Beer Garden

“Urban beer garden” is an excellent way to describe Riverland, as it captures the essence and vibe of a picturesque waterside café, along with the funky menu and comfort food offerings (think delicious BBQ, pulled pork sandwiches and plenty of fries) of one of your classic favorites. It is a fabulous go-to for a nice meal with a view, a good place to relax from the hustle and bustle during a long day of exploring, or a lovely place to simply sit and catch up with a friend or loved one as you watch the boats float by.

 

The Fair Trader Café & Bar

This funky eatery in downtown Melbourne is for the lovers of all things healthy, fresh, and organic. This is not to say Fair Trader is some vegan-exclusive, hippie dippie establishment with lamas out front to greet you; businessmen and fitness freaks sit side by side in this bustling café/restaurant, and it is a great place to meet friends, have a friendly and chatty lunch, or get some work done, if you don’t need absolute quiet. The menu offers quintessentially delicious Aussie (Melbourne) fair, featuring the classics like smashed avo, salads, sandwiches, with a menu variety that should suit just about anyone.

 

RMB Café

Disclaimer: Degraves Street should simply have its own category as “best places to eat in Melbourne” – straight up. All of the cafés and eateries along this fabulously cozy laneway off of Flinders Ln downtown Melbourne are amazing, delicious… need I go on. If you are looking for a place to eat, drink, (shop), chill… whatever – my go-to is the Flinders Lane area, and Degraves St. must have every possibility for yummy food options. RMB sits at the entry to Degraves, so has an open view down the lane and the tables outside provide an optimal perch for people watching. The menu is classic, with a wide variety for both breakfast and lunch options, ranging from a delicious take on smashed avocado toast, featuring a little spice and smoked salmon, to salads and sandwiches.

 

Mockturtle

How could you not love Mockturtle. Not just another hole in the wall on Degraves St., Mockturtle is funky, unique, and just plain cute. From its tiny two-person booths inside the café, to its menu scrawled in chalk along the boards outside, to its delicious coffee, Mockturtle is a solid go-to for coffee and food along Degraves. Brunch here is fantastic, with both traditional fare, as well as fun and sugary-sweet items that you should probably just go ahead and try… because there’s always tomorrow to start your “diet.”

 

Little Cupcakes

Indeed, another classic of Degraves Street, but it is one to even give Doughnut Time a run for its money! (You should still go get a doughnut, anyway). Delicious coffee, quaint vibes… baby cupcakes. What more could you possibly want on an afternoon stroll through downtown Melbourne. Hit up Little Cupcakes before your next weekend tea party, girls night in, or perhaps even your snuggly picnic in the park!

 

#

(Yes, Hash). Officially “Hash Specialty Coffee & Roaster,” # is a vibrant and quirky café and restaurant on Hardware St. The menu offers a classic range of delicious meals and snacks, with a beautiful and funky twist. For example, # porridge is adorned with a lovely array of flowers, nuts, and seeds so that it really looks like the porridge fairies would eat. You MUST try the fairy floss hot chocolate; as it sounds, a tall plume of sugary fairy floss (cotton candy, for us Americans) is served in a mug, looking a bit like one of those 90s troll-dolls fell in too far. Alongside in a chemistry beaker comes hot, silky rich chocolate liquid. Now, get your cameras at the ready and go ahead! Watch the fairy floss melt away as you pour the chocolate over, and try not to get too distracted as to miss the mug!

 

Oli & Levi Café

This is one of those places that truly embodies the Melburnian culture (or one of the cultures, anyway) of taking coffee really, really, seriously – but delivering it with an air of effortless sophistication in a rough and tumble atmosphere. To outsiders, the café appears to be a hipster hotspot, but it’s so much more than that. This place has transcended hipster, or was hipster before hipster existed, however you may explain it. There is one wooden table inside where you are welcomed to sit and enjoy your small breakfast snacks and expertly-crafted coffee over the  but it may be reasonable to not expect a seat at any given time, simply because the place is so small.

 

Naked for Satan

This. is. a Melbourne CLASSIC. Dark rooms with antiquated wooden furniture drenched in red velvet, curated heurs d’oeuvres on toothpicks, and yes I’m getting there… a certain level of nudity. I’m not going to tell you where, or how. Just go and see for yourself. Don’t worry, it’s nothing too crazy; in fact, NFS is arguably the coolest hangout spot (shoutout to the epic rooftop with a complete view of the Melbourne skyline) in the city! It is a favorite of locals and visitors alike, and you must spend at least one (hopefully sunny!) avo sipping a craft local beer or one of the Naked for Satan specially-flavored vodka infused teas up on the roof.

 

Bimbo Deluxe

Bimbo is at least a must-see, if not a must-visit, during your time in Melbourne and is an obvious destination if you find yourself in Brunswick. Just up the street for our fave Naked for Satan, Bimbo is its very own brand of weird- you’ll quickly see why. From the giant plastic baby doll suspended from the façade of the building high above the heads of wondering passerby, to the famous $4 PIZZA after 7pm, and all day on Sundays. Shit gets a little weird (what am I saying, it was already weird to begin with) in Bimbo… in a good way.

 

Go-to foodie areas for when you’re in town:

Queen Victoria (Night) Market

Degraves St, off Flinders Ln

Hardware Lane (and Street)

Brunswick (walk the length of Brunswick St.)

 

 

Go on people, the coffee isn’t going to drink itself!!

Bondi to Coogee Beach Walk – Sydney’s Best Coastal Walk!

by , on
Feb 5, 2017

In my book, sand between my toes, sunshine on my face and saltwater is more or less all that it takes to make me happy. A Saturday at the beach is a Saturday wonderfully spent, and what could possibly make it a more perfect weekend than to enjoy not just one, but several of Sydney’s gorgeous coastal beaches. Albeit coming from a tourist’s fresh perspective on the city, the coastal walk from Bondi Beach to Coogee Beach is a total must-do, and something that may just bring you back time and again (I’ve already been twice for a relatively short time in Oz!)

 

Getting there:

You can of course start the walk from either end, or anywhere along the way.. I chose to start from Bondi Beach, at the quintessentially fabulous Bondi Icebergs club. If you are coming from Sydney CBD, a quick metro ride to Bondi Junction Station and a short bus from there to the beachfront lets you soak in some of Bondi’s beauty (and heat!) before heading off. I always love visiting the graffiti wall (always new and amazing art up), watching slack-jawed as 6 year olds tear up the skate park and inevitably lead me to question how I ever thought I had a shred of athletic talent, and then maybe even catch some rays or wave jump at the beach before heading on up to icebergs.

 

Once you’re at icebergs, whether or not you hang for a while (only $5 AUD) for full day access to pools and facilities, head along to the back on the middle level (where you see all the selfies taking place along the handrail overlooking the ocean pools) and your coastal beach walk path begins right there! Now you’re off for a gorgeous trip- as an insufferable tourist and photography addict, I do the beach walk at least equipped with iPhone and GoPro – I haven’t yet lugged my bigger camera around, mostly because I’m just there for the experience. Also, it’s likely (and I highly recommend it) that you’ll stop off at each beach, bay, or lookout to enjoy the views, take a dip, sunbathe… or who knows, catch a stray game of beach cricket or volleyball! In this case, especially if doing the walk alone, you may not want to be bogged down with extra (and valuable) baggage.

 

Should I run a marathon to prepare?

I mean, sure, go for it – probably not needed. I would place the beach walk firmly in the scenic category, not even really lapsing into challenging and certainly not dangerous, though I definitely think that you are secretly getting some great exercise regardless! While the entire walk is conveniently paved, there are lookouts, rock pools and other fun scenic spots that require a little scrambling, and the walk involves inclines and a good amount of stairs near Gordon Bay… I’ve seen ALL sorts of people, with all sorts of companions (animals, children, baby strollers, etc.) do this walk, but definitely would be a good idea to wear comfy walking gear/shoes. I’ve done the walk twice in bikini and flip flops, but I’m also a beach bum… your call.

 

What to Bring: The Essentials:

Well, back to my photography/beach bum spiel- this is really a personal choice, but remember you’re not hiking Mt. Everest, and not hiking at all, for that matter. Bikini and flippy floppies? FINE. Cutest of cute sundress, sunnies, heels (ehhhh?-seen it done, but not sure where they were going with that) and a derby-ready hat? SURE- you do you, just please if there’s one thing you take away from this, remember the damn sunscreen. I could devote an entire post just to the SUN here in OZ (which I may just do, btw), but it’s really. Not. Fooling. Around. Those people who “don’t need sunscreen” because they “never burn” or when they “just go on a walk…” NOPE. Please wear it, stay safe kids. And who wants to be a lobster smothered in aloe unable to shower for 2 days anyway.

 

My bringalong list: iPhone (battery pack optional), GoPro, sunscreen, sarong/coverup, flipflops/runners, toggles(aussie for bikini/swimsuit ;), sunglasses and/or hat. Beyond this, go crazy, bring a great book and find a nice nook in the cliff pools overlooking an insanely gorgeous view! Bring your inflatable flamingo or unicorn!! (but just… don’t).

 

What to DO along the way:

Depending on how much of your day you want to dedicate to the walk, there are endless options awaiting you. For me, the scenery, sunshine, slight exercise and a dip every now and then at a different beach is the perfect formula, but for the extra-actives, why not start with a surf and skateboard, do some swimming along the way, and end with stand-up-paddle boarding at Gordon’s Bay or Coogee Beach! The walk essentially consists of six “sections”:

 

Bondi to Tamarama: Scenic views

Tamarama to Bronte: watch the surfers, more scenic views. There are picnic areas and parks along both of these, as well as training parks for the runners/fitness lovers! While Tamarama is quite small, Bronte is larger and quite popular among families. The Bronte pools offer another ocean pool experience with a small jumping rock, which, even though most frequented by ten year olds, is still tempting to all of us.

Bronte to Clovelly: You’ll hit some uphills here, and most noticeably walk right smack through the famous Waverly Cemetery. I make sure to hit this part of the walk well before sunset… perhaps you will share my sentiment once you see this bit of the walk for yourself. Once you get into Clovelly, you’ll start seeing the Clovelly beach clubs etc. and a lawn bowling court which was home to the first-ever game of lawn bowling that I’ve ever witnessed played by people under the age of 70- go team.

Clovelly to Coogee: Stairs and hills are involved, and the view will be amazing from atop Gordon’s Bay, also popular amongst divers and paddle boarders. You will notice a small sign before going up a long flight of stairs to continue your walk for the “Underwater Nature Trail,” essentially a trail marked by cement and chain that can be completed in around 30 min underwater. This is definitely on my list as soon as I break into the diving game!  As you arrive to Coogee, you will see “Ocean Baths”- I wasn’t positive what these were at first, but they are actually fantastic natural pools formed by some rock outcroppings and ocean, creating a lovely bathing area! Family and adventure-junkie friendly, this place is a gem.

Coogee Beach: As you near Coogee (the end of your journey, unless you plan to continue your beach walk on to Maroubra), you will be able to hear it from the insane level of noise emitting from Coogee Pav; the pav is a bit of a hybrid between private beach club and South Beach bar, featuring the widest possible range of patrons, from just-off-the-beach bikini clad hooligans to bejeweled and grey haired couples. Regardless of the style, one thing is certain: the sangria is flowing, merry is being made, and you will sure as hell hear it.

 

If the idea of trying to blend in at the Pav seems somewhat overwhelming to you at the moment, head on down along the beach until you come to some stairs-directly across the street from these are several restaurants, starting with Little Jack Horner, a pick of mine. This street has a pretty solid range of choices, from trendy seafood dishes to Thai and Brazilian BBQ to the “Brookie”- a brownie-cookie filled with intense gelato… obviously a must. My move after the walk is usually to find my way to some food, grab dinner and as the sun is setting, take my Brookie, ice cream or dessert of choice to the beachfront and watch the waves roll in as the sunset turns the sky to cotton candy.

 

Getting (home):

If you are heading back to Sydney from Coogee, it’s just another relatively easy bus to Bondi Junction Station and train back into town. By this time, nobody cares how many clothes you (aren’t) wearing, how crispy your legs are or how much sand you track in behind you, so you shouldn’t either. Just soak in the happiness from a lovely day of those gorgeous views, amazing beaches and good, good vibes.

36 HOURS IN ANTWERP – 10 Things you Must see if you Only Have the Weekend

by , on
Dec 25, 2016

So you’re headed to Antwerp! Only have one weekend? Not to fear – even though Antwerp is such a gorgeous, amazing place and there is so much to do, you can certainly get to know this lovely city in a few days… here are a few fun ideas:

 

TO VISIT

Cathedral of our Lady (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal Antwerpen)

A Roman Catholic Cathedral built in Gothic style, this structure’s final stage of construction was completed in 1521, though it nevertheless remains considered “incomplete.” Beautiful from all angles and at all times of day, it is not only extremely photogenic, but offers a convenient central reference point to any confused tourists wandering too far astray. For a small fee, visitors may enter the cathedral and see works by notable painters such as Peter Paul Rubens, Otto Van Veen, Jacob de Backer and Marten de Vos.

 

Grote Markt (Great Market Square)

Situated at the heart of the old city quarter, Grote Markt must inevitably be any visitor’s priority (or perhaps even base) on their visit to Antwerp. Home to various shows, exhibits and demonstrations throughout the year, and even a Christmas Market and ice rink in December, Grote Markt is one of the most popular convening spots for locals and tourists alike (indeed one of the most heavily-peopled areas of the city, though still a must-see.)

 

Stadhuis van Antwerpen (Antwerp City Hall)

Standing on the western side of Grote Markt, the building incorporates both Flemish and Italian influences in its striking design. Erected between 1561 and 1565, it is listed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List. Curious about all of the flags? I was too – I discovered that in fact, throughout most of the year, 87 flags decorate the hall’s façade. The central flags on the bottom row represent Antwerp, Flanders, Belgium, Europe and the United Nations. The other flags represent countries that are member of the European Union and nations that have a consulate in Antwerp.

 

Brabo Statue

After taking photos of the market square and admiring Brabo, I wondered what the significance of his location/posture actually is; the statue in fact represents a mythical Roman solider, Silvius Brabo, who is said to have killed a giant- as the story goes, the giant always asked money from people who wanted to pass the bridge over the river Scheldt, and cut off the hands of those who would not pay. Because of this, Brabo also cut off the hand of the giant and threw it into the river (hence the design of the statue, if you look closely!)

 

Sint Andrieskirk

St. Andrew’s Church is one to walk through, for its gorgeous large stained glass windows, depicting (as per usual) various biblical scenes… and not to be missed on your visit is a rather uniquely-clad Virgin Mary, complete with sequins, feathers (yes, feathers) – and I will let you decide for yourself about baby Jesus.

 

MAS (Museum aan de Stroom)

  

This artsy structure, composed of wiggly glass and lego-like red brick, is nestled amongst bits of land near the port, north of Schipperskwartier (area). Enjoy permanent exhibits covering topics like the importance of shipping to Antwerp’s relationship with the world, food in the city, and even an examination of life and death across several different cultures. Once you are done perusing these, enjoy a panoramic view of the city and sea from the open-air viewing deck on the 10th floor! Just across the small bridge from MAS is a glumly-industrial shipping area, turned up and coming by the presence of various hipster culinary establishments, from burger joints to espresso cafés to “The Shack,” exclusively serving designer bagels and coffee. This makes even a hung-over museum day a happy one.

 

Rubenshuis 

     

Take a stroll through Ruben’s House if you have about one hour to spare, or perhaps if the weather is not to die for, as you will spend most of your time indoors. The former home of artist Peter Paul Rubens, Rubenshuis is now a museum, still housing many works by Rubens and his contemporaries, as well as his personal collections.

 

Vlaeykensgang

A hidden (tiny) alleyway along Oude Koornmarkt, which has all manner of restaurants and bars for any occasion, food type and time of day. Escape briefly from the friendly chaos of this major street for some quiet reprieve along Vlaeykensgang while enjoying adorable flower boxes of red geraniums in whitewashed windows, or perhaps even choosing a more intimate dinner location at one of the restaurants towards the end of the path.

 

Meir Street

    

A baby version of London’s Oxford Street in Antwerp! If you walk straight into the city center from the central train station, you will walk onto this street, which is one of, if not the major shopping street of Antwerp, complemented by sophisticated cafés and eateries, and walled on both sides by tall buildings- look up, the architecture (and angels!) is beautiful.

 

Bourla Schowburg (Bourla Theater)

The theater, completed in 1834, seats 900 people. The building is designed in a neoclassical style on the site of the former Tapissierspand tapestry market, within short walking distance of several boutique shops and restaurants.

 

TO STAY

My Choice:

Antwerp City Hostel is perfect for budget travel or a quick weekend getaway for last-minute planners. Situated directly on Grote Markt, guests have immediate access to the Cathedral and market, and all restaurants, cafés, and bars surrounding this central area. One night from 30 euros.

Popular Recommendations:

Aplace Antwerp (Vrijdagmarkt 1; aplace.be) has four lovely, recently renovated rooms — two suites, two apartments — on a quiet square in the city center. The friendly innkeeper, Karin, gives guests insider tips about the city (and sometimes brings by cupcakes, too). Suites from 125 euros.

The Hotel O Kathedral (Handschoenmarkt 3; hotelhotelo.com) is as central as it gets — right across the square from the cathedral. Under the hotel’s white stepped-gable roof, there are 23 minimalist rooms, some with peek-a-boo showers, as well as a downstairs bar and bookshop. Doubles from 99 euros.

 

TO EAT

Waffle Factory: You need this in your life, that is all I will say. Unless you think you can handle ice cream as well, then get it too.

Elfde Gebod: (11th commandment) – enjoy a delicious cauldron full of steamed mussels in either garlic, belgian beer or other flavors (this is a must-eat when in Belgium of course) at an outdoor patio along a cobblestone street with a view of the Cathedral- at night, everything lights up for extra charm.

The Shack: Bagels & coffee (across the river, past the MAS) – again, there are many attractive eateries and cafés out in this area, you won’t want to miss grabbing a snack before or after your trip to MAS!

Grote Markt is a good starting point for restaurants, as there are many places to eat around the main square. Oude Koornmarkt street is also a great place for restaurants, and you won’t have far to look- this street is more lively and fun.

 

Go on – enjoy this amazing city and comment below about your own adventures!!! 🙂